Search Results for biofuels
37 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Accelerating the Growth of Solar and Wind with Biofuels

Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: May 14, 2018 at 10:30 AM

Electricity generated from solar and wind has grown rapidly in the past few decades. However, its continued growth is imperiled by the high costs of grid integration. While solar and wind energy enjoy low operating costs, they are intermittent and variable on multiple time scales. Thus they may not be available when needed. Storing electrical energy is costly and so is providing backup power. Thus grid integration costs rise as the penetration of solar and wind electricity increases. There is a strong positive correlation between installed wind and solar capacity versus the residential energy price in 21 member countries of… [more]

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Discussion

Opportunities for Carbon Capture in California

Author(s): Fatima Maria Ahmad
Solutions Fellow
Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
Date: May 9, 2017 at 11:00 AM

California has demonstrated leadership in setting ambitious goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by setting a target to reduce emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. While California is reducing emissions and expanding clean energy through many means, including a cap-and-trade program, the state appears to be underestimating the effectiveness and readiness of carbon capture technology and how it could help California reach its goal. In consensus comments on the California Air Resources Board’s (CARB) draft 2017 Climate Change Scoping Plan Update, a diverse group of nonprofits (including C2ES); environmental groups; and oil, gas, and ethanol companies outlined… [more]

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Discussion

Why You Should Care about Low Carbon Fuels and Vehicle Initiatives

Author(s): Tammy Klein
Consultant
Future Fuel Strategies
Date: December 19, 2016 at 11:30 AM

Citizens and policymakers in many countries have never been more committed to combating climate change across all sectors. One high-emitting sector that is often overlooked, when compared to industry and manufacturing, is transportation. Transport currently contributes 23% of energy-related greenhouse gas emissions and 20% of energy use. Globally, the sector is expected to double by 2030, according to IEA. Decarbonizing transport is a major challenge with some strong and powerful advocates calling for a single one-shot solution (electrification). However, achieving decarbonization in the transport sector will require multiple strategies that understand fossil fuel demand will remain in place for some… [more]

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Discussion

Increasing U.S. Energy Security and Reducing Greenhouse Gases in the Transportation Sector: Electricity vs. Biofuels

Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: July 14, 2015 at 8:00 AM

U. S. renewable fuel policy has two primary objectives: 1) to reduce petroleum imports, increasing energy security and 2) to reduce greenhouse gas generation in the transportation sector. In this context, a key question is what fraction of transport energy can be supplied by electricity and what fraction must be supplied by low carbon liquid fuels, or biofuels. Two recent papers, one focused on the U.S. and another with a global perspective, show that the ability of electricity to serve the light duty fleet is much less than previously thought if both energy security and GHG reduction are to be… [more]

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Discussion

What’s Next for the RFS?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 29, 2015 at 12:00 PM

In November, 2013, EPA announced a highly contentious proposal that lowered the 2014 Renewable Fuel Standard targets below their 2013 levels. These targets apply to the amount of renewable fuels that are blended into the nation’s gasoline supply. A year later, EPA abandoned the proposal after significant push back from the renewable fuel industry, agreeing to reconsider the 2014 targets. EPA has yet to reissue the proposal. The American Petroleum Institute (API) and the American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM) filed a lawsuit over the delay, contending that they are left guessing how much ethanol they were required to use last… [more]

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Discussion

Legal and Regulatory Issues Related to the Renewable Fuel Standard

Author(s): Tracy Terry
Director, Energy Project
Bipartisan Policy Center
Date: March 19, 2014 at 7:00 AM

The Bipartisan Policy Center’s (BPC) Energy Project seeks your input as part of a yearlong effort aimed at fostering constructive dialogue and action on reforming the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). BPC commissioned a series of background papers on various RFS topics. The last three papers, summarized below, approach the RFS from the perspectives of policy and law, considering both the Environmental Protection Agency’s authority as well as broader federal regulations. Inventory of Federal Regulations Affecting Biofuels other than the Renewable Fuel Standard [Read here] Van Ness Feldman “Although the RFS has been the key driver in the production and use… [more]

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Discussion

Vehicle and Supply Chain Issues Related to the Renewable Fuel Standard

Author(s): Tracy Terry
Director, Energy Project
Bipartisan Policy Center
Date: March 18, 2014 at 7:00 AM

The Bipartisan Policy Center’s (BPC) Energy Project seeks your input as part of a yearlong effort aimed at fostering constructive dialogue and action on reforming the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). BPC commissioned a series of background papers on various RFS topics. The first two papers, summarized below, approach the RFS from the standpoint of technology and infrastructure, considering both vehicles and the fuels supply chain. Technical Barriers to the Consumption of Higher Blends of Ethanol [Read here] The International Council on Clean Transportation “Taking all of these studies together, we conclude that vehicles model year 2001 or later can safely… [more]

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Discussion

“60 Minutes” Calls Cleantech a Bust

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: January 8, 2014 at 2:30 PM

A recent “60 Minutes” segment essentially called the cleantech industry a failure, eliciting a flurry of criticisms defending the green technology sector. “Hoping to create innovation and jobs, [President Obama] committed north of $100 billion in loans, grants and tax breaks to cleantech. But instead of breakthroughs, the sector suffered a string of expensive tax-funded flops. Suddenly cleantech was a dirty word,” said “60 Minutes’” host, Lesley Stahl. One of the main criticisms against the CBS segment was that it conflated the cleantech venture capital sector of Silicon Valley with the Department of Energy’s loan guarantee program. The critics have… [more]

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Discussion

Should The Renewable Fuel Standard Change With Fuel Demand?

Author(s): Matthew Carr
Managing Director, Industrial & Environmental Section
Biotechnology Industry Organization
Date: October 30, 2013 at 7:00 AM

A recent editorial in the Wall Street Journal, co-signed by Rep. Patrick Meehan (R-Pa.), argues that growing renewable fuel obligations under the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) have come into direct conflict with declining U.S. demand for transportation fuel.  The editorial asserts that current fuel distribution infrastructure and automobile engine guidelines limit the amount of ethanol that can be blended into gasoline to 10 percent, creating a “blend wall” beyond which further blending of ethanol becomes economically unreasonable. Meanwhile, in response to high fuel prices, consumers have radically curbed their driving habits and sought out new cars that meet more… [more]

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Discussion

Fuel Choice and Energy Security

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 22, 2013 at 7:05 AM

A report, “Fuel Choice for American Prosperity,” recently published by the United States Energy Security Council (USESC), a group within the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security (IAGS), identifies challenges facing the United States’ pursuit of energy security. Despite oil imports expected to fall to their lowest level since 1987 (EIA), the total amount of money the U.S. spends on oil imports has increased. If energy security is defined as “reliable supply at an affordable price,” as the report’s authors define, the U.S. has improved the former, but failed to impact global oil prices, which have risen more than… [more]

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