Search Results for cap-and-trade
8 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

A Carbon Dividends Plan

Author(s): Dan Miller
Managing Director
The Roda Group
Date: February 14, 2017 at 9:00 AM

Climate change poses a threat to the safety and prosperity of America’s and the world’s citizens. Every major scientific academy agrees that global warming is real, is mostly caused by humans, and requires urgent action. The signs of climate change are all around us. For example, the volume of the summer Arctic sea ice has dropped about 70% in the past 30 years and global temperatures have set records for the past 3 years in a row. And while most world leaders and climate scientists agree that we should not let the world warm more than +2ºC, we are on… [more]

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Discussion

Achieving Emissions Targets Without Cap-and-Trade

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 1, 2012 at 7:21 AM

A new report from RFF points out that despite the absence of cap-and-trade legislation, the United States is on course to reach the same emissions reduction goal – 17 percent fewer emissions from 2005 levels by 2020 – that would have been mandated under the Waxman–Markey cap-and-trade proposal [H.R. 2454], if it had become law in 2010. The report identified three factors contributing to the emissions reductions projections: Regulations under the Clean Air Act that were set to take effect without cap-and-trade legislation, particularly expected operating performance standards for new and existing stationary sources and vehicle efficiency standards; trends in fuel… [more]

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Discussion

Can We Rely on Technology to Stop Climate Change?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: July 26, 2012 at 7:20 AM

In a column for the New York Times titled “There’s Still Hope for the Planet,” columnist David Leonhardt describes why investments in technology – particularly governmental investments in clean tech research and development – may be the best bet for reducing CO2 emissions, and may provide a small basis for optimism to those interested in fighting climate change. Leonhardt argues that renewable energy, which is becoming increasingly cost-competitive with traditional fossil fuels, and the emergence of natural gas as a replacement for coal, make putting a price on CO2 emissions less attractive than investment programs. “Carbon pricing is going to… [more]

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Discussion

The Status of Clean Coal

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: July 10, 2012 at 7:36 AM

Coal is one of America’s most abundant and affordable energy sources, and has served for decades as the country’s primary base load electric fuel. Coal comes with significant environmental trade-offs, including local air and water pollution, deforestation, and mountaintop removal from mining process, and greenhouse gas and toxic particulate emissions from burning it to generate electricity. Given plentiful U.S. supplies of low-cost coal, there is clear economic and energy security rationale for continuing to use coal, and government and industry have worked for years to promote and demonstrate “clean coal” technologies. It is hoped that these technologies will capture CO2… [more]

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Discussion

Does Cap and Trade Promote Innovation?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 23, 2012 at 7:36 AM

A study of successful cap-and-trade schemes published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science found that cap-and-trade policies – a widely favored tool in climate change mitigation – do not necessarily provide sufficient incentives for firms to innovative environmentally-preferable processes and technologies. This finding is significant, as a central argument in favor of cap-and-trade schemes is that they provide price signals that lead firms toward innovation. The study’s author, Margaret Taylor, a researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, notes that compliance costs are frequently overestimated by firms and policymakers during the cap-and-trade schemes’ formulation. Because of this, capped… [more]

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Discussion

Key provisions of the draft U.S. Senate bill the American Power Act

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 20, 2011 at 5:09 PM

Note: Synopsis based on Our Energy Policy Foundation staff review of Congressional committee and office summaries, third party analyses, and media summaries. Synopsis intended solely for purposes of generating discussion. Greenhouse Gas Reductions Would require certain industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions below 2005 levels along the following timeline: 4.75% by 2013, 17% by 2020, 42% by 2030, and 83% by 2050. Would institute a cap-and-trade mechanism for greenhouse gas reductions. The cap would include electricity generators, petroleum-based fuel producers, natural gas distributors, producers of certain fluorinated gases, and other sources. Requirements would take effect in 2013 for electricity generators… [more]

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Discussion

Key provisions of H.R. 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 5:08 PM

Note: Synopsis based on Our Energy Policy Foundation staff review of Congressional committee and office summaries, third party analyses, and media summaries. Synopsis intended solely for the purposes of generating discussion. Renewable Electricity Standard Would require electric utilities to meet 6% of their electricity demand through renewable energy sources and energy efficiency by 2012, and 20% by 2020. Qualifying renewable energy sources are solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, marine and hydrokinetic energy, certain biofuels, wastewater-treatment gas, landfill gas, coalmine methane, and post-1992 hydropower projects. Up to 1/4 of the 2020 requirement (or 5%) could be met through energy efficiency improvements. If… [more]

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Discussion

Discussion Catalyst: Carbon Policies

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 17, 2011 at 4:17 PM

[Note: The statements below are intended solely to stimulate discussion among the Expert community, and do not represent the position of OurEnergyPolicy.org. Text in italics indicates clarification or expansion.]   There is a question what carbon policy is most suited to the U.S. The question boils down to the best way to force GHG emitters to spend enough money on reduction of CO2 and other GHG. Several policies have been discussed or tried around the world: Cap and Trade Cap and trade is a popular yet problematic solution. Firstly, it hasn’t produced the expected significant change in places it has… [more]

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