Search Results for climate-change
137 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Coordinating State and Federal Energy Policy in Support of Nuclear

Author(s): Dr. Andrew C. Kadak
President
Kadak Associates, Inc.
Date: November 16, 2015 at 12:00 PM

There is an inconvenient and uncomfortable truth that nuclear energy is a significant non-CO2 source of electrical power in the U.S. Despite the dramatic expansion of solar and wind, these alternative forms of energy only provide 15% of non-CO2 emitting power nationwide. Nuclear energy on the other hand, provides 63% of all CO2-free sources. Often when a utility decides to shut down a nuclear plant it is replaced by natural gas. But replacing nuclear with “clean” natural gas only adds to the global CO2 load. In fact, each 1,000 megawatts of nuclear power replaced by natural gas adds 3.6 million… [more]

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Discussion

Energy Technology Perspectives 2015: Mobilising Innovation to Accelerate Climate Action

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 3, 2015 at 3:41 PM

Full Title: Energy Technology Perspectives 2015: Mobilising Innovation to Accelerate Climate Action Author(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): As climate negotiators work towards a deal that would limit the increase in global temperatures, interest is growing in the essential role technology innovation can and must play in enabling the transition to a low-carbon energy system. Indeed, recent success stories clearly indicate that there is significant and untapped potential for accelerating innovation in clean technologies if proper policy frameworks are in place. In an especially timely analysis, the 2015… [more]

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Discussion

Climate Change Failure?

Author(s): Herschel Specter
President
Micro-Utilities, Inc.
Date: October 19, 2015 at 12:00 PM

Attitudes towards climate change vary. Some have doubts, but even fish know better as they migrate north to cooler waters. Meanwhile advocates agree that human influence is clear, but they are divided on how to address climate change, with too much focus on individual energy sources when in reality all non-carbon sources of energy have major problems. The divisions amongst advocates can undermine national energy policies and render U.S. policymakers ineffective. But most importantly, divisions amongst advocates rallying for an ‘all-solar,’ ‘all-nuclear,’ or ‘all-anything’ energy system ignore large problems facing a carbon-free future. There are numerous problems and realities facing a… [more]

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Discussion

2013 Renewable Energy Data Book

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: August 31, 2015 at 3:38 PM

Full Title: 2013 Renewable Energy Data Book Author(s): U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Publisher(s): U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Publication Date: 2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Key Findings: •United States overall energy consumption grew to 97.3 quadrillion Btu in 2013, a 2.4% increase from 2012. Energy consumption from coal and renewables grew slightly, while consumption from petroleum and natural gas fell slightly. • United States electric power sector energy consumption grew to 38.4 quadrillion Btu in 2013, a 0.6% increase from 2012.* • Renewable electricity** grew to nearly 15% of total installed capacity and 13% of total electricity generation… [more]

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Discussion

Tax Pollution, Not Profits

Author(s): Congressman John Delaney (D-MD)
Member
U.S. House of Representatives
Date: July 7, 2015 at 8:00 AM

Climate change is a threat to our environment and our economy, and we cannot afford the risk of inaction. With our free market economy, the best solution is a simple, transparent tax on carbon that unleashes the power of the market and enables America to lead the way toward a new, clean energy economy. Importantly, a carbon tax produces revenues that can be used to help American businesses and families. But there are many options for how to use these revenues. Critics of carbon taxes frequently cite slower economic growth, increasing taxes on the poor, and hurting coal workers as… [more]

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Discussion

Loss and Damage under the UNFCCC

Author(s): Wil Burns
Co-Executive Director
The Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy, American University
Date: June 29, 2015 at 10:00 AM

The focus of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) originally was the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, as well as emissions associated with land-use change and forestry. However, by the 2000s scientists and policymakers realized that emissions targets were too low to avoid serious negative impacts, necessitating the development of adaptation responses as a complement to mitigation. In the past few years, it has become clear that historical emissions have “locked in” a certain level of climatic change, making some serious impacts unavoidable. Moreover, the feckless response of the world in arresting emissions makes even graver unavoidable… [more]

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Preparing the Next Generation of Energy Leaders

Author(s): Gernot Wagner
Lead Senior Economist
Environmental Defense Fund
Date: June 16, 2015 at 8:00 AM

What determines the cost of a ton of coal? Is OPEC an oligopoly? Should we subsidize low-carbon energy or tax fossil fuels? Do Prius owners drive more? These are among the questions I cover in my Economics of Energy class. I’ve taught this class at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs for the past five years. I hope to receive your feedback on how to improve this course. The course has two goals: to provide a set of tools to approach these and many other fundamental questions in energy economics, and to do so in plain English. Last… [more]

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Potential Reliability Impacts of EPA’s Proposed Clean Power Plan

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 11, 2015 at 10:24 AM

Full Title: Potential Reliability Impacts of EPA’s Proposed Clean Power Plan Author(s): North American Reliability Corporation (NERC) Publisher(s): North American Reliability Corporation (NERC) Publication Date: 04/2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its proposed Carbon Pollution Emission Guidelines for Existing Stationary Sources: Electric Utility Generating Units on June 2, 2014, commonly referred to as the proposed Clean Power Plan (CPP). The proposed rule is issued under Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act and establishes limits on CO2 emissions for existing electric generation facilities. The proposed rule is currently anticipated to be finalized during summer 2015.… [more]

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Discussion

The Road to Paris and Beyond: Comparing Emissions Mitigation Efforts

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 1, 2015 at 3:12 PM

Full Title: The Road to Paris and Beyond: Comparing Emissions Mitigation Efforts Author(s): Joseph E. Aldy and William A. Pizer Publisher(s): Resources for the Future (RFF) Publication Date: 2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): T his year, countries will pledge to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions as part of the negotiations leading up to the UN climate change talks in Paris in December. These pledges will take on many different forms: targets as a percentage of year 1990 or 2005 emissions, percentage improvements in the ratio of carbon dioxide emissions to GDP, percentage abatement versus a “no-policy” reference case, renewable power… [more]

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Discussion

How the EPA Should Modify Its Proposed 111(d) Regulations to Allow States to Comply By Taxing Pollution

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 19, 2015 at 3:47 PM

Full Title: How the EPA Should Modify Its Proposed 111(d) Regulations to Allow States to Comply By Taxing Pollution Author(s): Michael Wara, Adele Morris, and Marta R. Darby Publisher(s): Brookings Institution Publication Date: 10/24 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is exercising its authority under section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act to limit U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from existing stationary sources, beginning with carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil-fuel fired electric generating units (EGUs, power plants, or covered sources) [1]. This comment examines the extent to which EPA’s proposed rule for existing power… [more]

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