Search Results for climate-change
142 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

EPA’s Methane Rule

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 1, 2016 at 8:00 AM

In May, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released regulations designed to curb methane (CH4) emissions from new, modified and reconstructed oil and natural gas sources. As part of the Obama administration’s effort to combat climate change, the rule attempts to reduce methane emissions by as much as 45% from 2012 levels by 2025. According to the EPA, methane is the second most prevalent greenhouse gas emitted by humans on a pound for pound basis. Although the atmospheric lifetime of CH4 is much shorter than carbon dioxide (CO2), methane is at least 25 times more potent at trapping heat in the… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Should Energy Companies Disclose Their Climate Risk?

Author(s): Sharon Reishus
President
Reishus Consulting, LLC
Date: May 23, 2016 at 11:00 AM

The New York Attorney General has been investigating Exxon Mobil for failing to disclose to its investors the risk that climate change may have on the value of the company’s assets, including its extensive oil reserves, which some claim must remain in the ground if necessary future reductions in carbon emissions are to be achieved. As the controversy around Exxon Mobil’s carbon-related financial reporting continues, other entities are moving forward to address so-called climate change or “carbon asset” risk. In fact, the institutional investment fund CalPERS now requires that companies it chooses to invest in have at least one member… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Is there a Policy Path that Pursues Today’s Greenhouse Gains while Building the Capacity to Solve Tomorrow’s Grander Challenges?

Author(s): Andrew Revkin
Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding
Pace University
Date: February 23, 2016 at 5:00 PM

Transitioning to a non-polluting energy menu and safe climate in a world of growing energy needs and persistently abundant fossil fuels is a tough task, whatever path you favor. And realistically, there will be no single path, as the flexible architecture of the Paris climate agreement reflects. In the United States, for example, there are places where new nuclear plants have a chance, and places where solar and wind power can have a greatly increased role. In every country, in fact, with its own unique energy mix, the challenge posed by simple inertia in physical systems and in social, financial… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Unlocking the Power of Urban Transport Systems for Better Growth and a Better Climate

Author(s): Chad Edwards-Kuhn
Intern
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 12, 2016 at 11:25 AM

Full Title: Unlocking the Power of Urban Transport Systems for Better Growth and a Better Climate Author(s): Publisher(s): Publication Date: Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Sustainable transport systems are crucial for underpinning the economic performance and prosperity of nations. They are also critical for tackling global climate change and reducing local air pollution. This is particularly the case in the world’s urban areas. The majority of transport trips take place in and between cities. Cities are growing at an unprecedented rate, particularly in the developing world: 1.4 million people are being added to urban areas each week, and by… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

U.S. – China Energy Cooperation: Risks, Opportunities and Solutions

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 14, 2015 at 12:00 PM

At a recent event hosted by the Hudson Institute, energy professionals gathered to discuss energy issues affecting both the United States and China, with significant discussion centering on how low oil prices generally correlate with economic prosperity and stability – and vice versa. It is projected that China’s oil import dependence will rise from 60% in 2013 to 75% in 2035 and that, in the next 15 years, China will overtake the U.S. as the world’s largest oil consumer. Like the U.S., China’s sustained economic growth is directly influenced by the price of oil. Although crude oil price spikes are… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Coordinating State and Federal Energy Policy in Support of Nuclear

Author(s): Dr. Andrew C. Kadak
President
Kadak Associates, Inc.
Date: November 16, 2015 at 12:00 PM

There is an inconvenient and uncomfortable truth that nuclear energy is a significant non-CO2 source of electrical power in the U.S. Despite the dramatic expansion of solar and wind, these alternative forms of energy only provide 15% of non-CO2 emitting power nationwide. Nuclear energy on the other hand, provides 63% of all CO2-free sources. Often when a utility decides to shut down a nuclear plant it is replaced by natural gas. But replacing nuclear with “clean” natural gas only adds to the global CO2 load. In fact, each 1,000 megawatts of nuclear power replaced by natural gas adds 3.6 million… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Energy Technology Perspectives 2015: Mobilising Innovation to Accelerate Climate Action

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 3, 2015 at 3:41 PM

Full Title: Energy Technology Perspectives 2015: Mobilising Innovation to Accelerate Climate Action Author(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): As climate negotiators work towards a deal that would limit the increase in global temperatures, interest is growing in the essential role technology innovation can and must play in enabling the transition to a low-carbon energy system. Indeed, recent success stories clearly indicate that there is significant and untapped potential for accelerating innovation in clean technologies if proper policy frameworks are in place. In an especially timely analysis, the 2015… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Climate Change Failure?

Author(s): Herschel Specter
President
Micro-Utilities, Inc.
Date: October 19, 2015 at 12:00 PM

Attitudes towards climate change vary. Some have doubts, but even fish know better as they migrate north to cooler waters. Meanwhile advocates agree that human influence is clear, but they are divided on how to address climate change, with too much focus on individual energy sources when in reality all non-carbon sources of energy have major problems. The divisions amongst advocates can undermine national energy policies and render U.S. policymakers ineffective. But most importantly, divisions amongst advocates rallying for an ‘all-solar,’ ‘all-nuclear,’ or ‘all-anything’ energy system ignore large problems facing a carbon-free future. There are numerous problems and realities facing a… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

2013 Renewable Energy Data Book

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: August 31, 2015 at 3:38 PM

Full Title: 2013 Renewable Energy Data Book Author(s): U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Publisher(s): U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Publication Date: 2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Key Findings: •United States overall energy consumption grew to 97.3 quadrillion Btu in 2013, a 2.4% increase from 2012. Energy consumption from coal and renewables grew slightly, while consumption from petroleum and natural gas fell slightly. • United States electric power sector energy consumption grew to 38.4 quadrillion Btu in 2013, a 0.6% increase from 2012.* • Renewable electricity** grew to nearly 15% of total installed capacity and 13% of total electricity generation… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Tax Pollution, Not Profits

Author(s): Congressman John Delaney (D-MD)
Member
U.S. House of Representatives
Date: July 7, 2015 at 8:00 AM

Climate change is a threat to our environment and our economy, and we cannot afford the risk of inaction. With our free market economy, the best solution is a simple, transparent tax on carbon that unleashes the power of the market and enables America to lead the way toward a new, clean energy economy. Importantly, a carbon tax produces revenues that can be used to help American businesses and families. But there are many options for how to use these revenues. Critics of carbon taxes frequently cite slower economic growth, increasing taxes on the poor, and hurting coal workers as… [more]

View Discussion