Search Results for co2
10 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

After Two Defeats in Washington State, Where Next For A Carbon Tax?

Author(s): Ed Dolan
Senior Fellow
Niskanen Center
Date: November 26, 2018 at 10:04 AM

Conservative and progressive policy wonks agree: a carbon tax is the most promising of all tools to fight climate change. Such a tax would spur investments in green energy and encourage motorists to buy more electric cars. It would minimize the role of regulatory bureaucrats and maximize that of markets. What is not to love about a carbon tax? The sticking point is what to do with the billions of dollars of revenues such a tax would generate. Conservatives favor using the money for a revenue-neutral tax swap. Lower taxes on capital would encourage investment, lower payroll taxes would encourage… [more]

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Discussion

Opportunities for Carbon Capture in California

Author(s): Fatima Maria Ahmad
Solutions Fellow
Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
Date: May 9, 2017 at 11:00 AM

California has demonstrated leadership in setting ambitious goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by setting a target to reduce emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. While California is reducing emissions and expanding clean energy through many means, including a cap-and-trade program, the state appears to be underestimating the effectiveness and readiness of carbon capture technology and how it could help California reach its goal. In consensus comments on the California Air Resources Board’s (CARB) draft 2017 Climate Change Scoping Plan Update, a diverse group of nonprofits (including C2ES); environmental groups; and oil, gas, and ethanol companies outlined… [more]

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Discussion

Is there a Policy Path that Pursues Today’s Greenhouse Gains while Building the Capacity to Solve Tomorrow’s Grander Challenges?

Author(s): Andrew Revkin
Founding Director, Initiative on Communication and Sustainability
The Earth Institute, Columbia University
Date: February 23, 2016 at 5:00 PM

Transitioning to a non-polluting energy menu and safe climate in a world of growing energy needs and persistently abundant fossil fuels is a tough task, whatever path you favor. And realistically, there will be no single path, as the flexible architecture of the Paris climate agreement reflects. In the United States, for example, there are places where new nuclear plants have a chance, and places where solar and wind power can have a greatly increased role. In every country, in fact, with its own unique energy mix, the challenge posed by simple inertia in physical systems and in social, financial… [more]

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Discussion

The Case for Nuclear Central Station Power

Author(s): David Hammer
J.C. Ward Jr. Professor of Nuclear Energy Engineering
Cornell University
Date: September 9, 2015 at 9:30 AM

 “Sustainable future” advocates seem to believe that solar, wind and hydro-electricity will eventually make up close to 100% of our energy generation, but there are benefits to having “central station” power plants in addition to distributed power generation. If the goal is to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while assuring the health of our economy, the most viable way of generating central station power at present is nuclear fission. Central station power complements distributive power generation in two important ways.  Central station power plants are better able produce power on a small area relatively close to where the energy will… [more]

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Discussion

Potential Reliability Impacts of EPA’s Proposed Clean Power Plan

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 11, 2015 at 10:24 AM

Full Title: Potential Reliability Impacts of EPA’s Proposed Clean Power Plan Author(s): North American Reliability Corporation (NERC) Publisher(s): North American Reliability Corporation (NERC) Publication Date: 04/2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its proposed Carbon Pollution Emission Guidelines for Existing Stationary Sources: Electric Utility Generating Units on June 2, 2014, commonly referred to as the proposed Clean Power Plan (CPP). The proposed rule is issued under Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act and establishes limits on CO2 emissions for existing electric generation facilities. The proposed rule is currently anticipated to be finalized during summer 2015.… [more]

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Discussion

Condensing Furnace Standard Impact Analysis Discussion Document

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 8, 2015 at 4:46 PM

Full Title: Condensing Furnace Standard Impact Analysis Discussion Document Author(s): American Gas Association (AGA) Publisher(s): American Gas Association (AGA) Publication Date: 2014 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): AGA and GTI developed a spreadsheet model to analyze and measure the impact on the key metrics that energy efficiency standards are designed to improve using the results from the GTI Fuel Switching Study and the AGA Marginal Cost Analysis. A “Case Study” spreadsheet model using 2012 annual furnace shipment data, market data from public sources and the findings from the two studies referenced above was developed to assess and quantify the potential… [more]

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Discussion

Carbon Tax on the Table

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 15, 2012 at 7:10 AM

As the US nears the “fiscal cliff,” the idea of a revenue-neutral carbon “tax swap,” which would see revenue from a carbon tax used to reduce other taxes, while driving innovation in energy efficiency and alternative energy, has been proposed by a number of policymakers and academics. A new report from the Institute for Energy Research argues against the carbon “tax swap,” pointing to technical and pragmatic flaws, such as the probability of emissions “leaking” to other, less regulated regions, like China. A report from MIT, however, found that a carbon tax would have multiple benefits, such as reducing emissions,… [more]

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The Impact of Climate Policy on Natural Gas Development

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 15, 2012 at 7:25 AM

The rapid proliferation of natural gas development has led to a variety of environmental concerns, such as air and water pollution, increased geological activity, and greenhouse gas emissions. A new paper from John Bistline, a doctoral candidate in Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University, investigates how “uncertainties in future natural gas prices, upstream methane emissions, the global-warming potential of methane, and the stringency of federal climate policy will influence optimal (GHG) abatement efforts” and the “future deployment of energy technologies.” Generating capacity decisions are made along long and largely uncertain planning horizons, and plants often come online into very… [more]

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Discussion

The Future of Enhanced Oil Recovery

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 10, 2012 at 7:30 AM

Denbury, a small energy resources firm focused on oil and natural gas, sees a bright future in enhanced oil recovery (EOR), a process that pumps CO2 into oil wells to release hard-to-reach oil. EOR has been promoted as a way to simultaneously address climate change and improve recoverable oil reserves. The company surprised many recently after it traded its Bakken Shale assets – some of the most productive in the country – to Exxon Mobil in exchange for $1.6 billion in cash and parts of Exxon Mobil’s Texas and Wyoming stakes. Denbury will instead focus on utilizing EOR in its… [more]

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Discussion

Natural Gas and Hydrofracking

Author(s): David J. Manning
Director, Stakeholder Relations/External Affairs
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Date: January 6, 2012 at 8:45 AM

Hydrofracking for natural gas in shale formations has generated a heated national debate, complicating and in some cases preventing efforts to extract the resource. Critics of hydrofracking cite the process’ uncertain environmental and geologic risks. Meanwhile, natural gas developers and policymakers have been working to identify and implement technical standards and best practices to overcome or reduce these risks to negligible levels. In my home state of New York, Governor Andrew Cuomo has said of hydrofracking: “Let’s get the facts. Let the science and the facts make the determination, not emotion and not politics.” I agree. State of the art… [more]

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