Search Results for coal
63 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Looking Back and Pushing Ahead: Energy Policy in the New Year

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 31, 2018 at 10:29 AM

From attempts to bail out coal and nuclear to a Green New Deal, 2018 was an interesting year for energy policy. With a newly divided Congress taking office in January, it seems likely that disagreements regarding the future of the energy industry will continue in 2019, though there may be areas with potential for bipartisanship. Outside of the federal government, it can be expected that 2019 will continue the trend of many state and local governments, as well as private organizations, being active in shaping the direction of our energy sector. A major trend of 2018, which will continue into… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

The Problem with Renewable Energy Subsidies

Author(s): Cutter González
Energy Project Campaign Manager, Policy Analyst
Texas Public Policy Foundation
Date: December 3, 2018 at 11:37 AM

The Production Tax Credit (PTC), a federal subsidy for renewable energy, is a $24-per-megawatt-hour credit based on energy production rather than demand. That means those who produce renewable energy can receive the credit regardless of whether or not that electricity is actually needed. The incentive is so immense that at peak hours of output wind producers can actually pay retail electric providers, the companies that deliver the energy to homes and businesses, to take their product. This “negative pricing” scheme caused by the PTC and other subsidies is having serious consequences.The instability it causes can push out the energy producers that… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Energy Company Bailouts: Avoiding the Mistakes of the Past

Author(s): Brandon Arnold
Executive Vice President
National Taxpayers Union
Date: October 8, 2018 at 11:30 AM

Republicans rightly criticized the $500 million loan guarantee to failed solar energy company Solyndra under the Obama administration, but now the current administration is preparing an energy industry bailout that will dwarf the size of that mistake. If this bailout goes forward, taxpayers will be on the hook for billions of dollars for failing coal and nuclear power plants. The Solyndra failure was a textbook example of the pitfalls that exist when the federal government tries to pick winners and losers in the energy industry. The Trump administration seems to not have learned the lesson, as a number of financially… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Can the US Phase Out Fossil Fuel Subsidies?

Author(s): Han Chen
International Climate Advocate, Global Advocacy, International Program
Natural Resources Defense Council
Date: June 25, 2018 at 2:13 PM

The use of fossil fuels drives climate change. Unfortunately, the path to clean sources of electricity, heat, and transport is impeded by the continued government subsidization of fossil fuels. In our recent Scorecard measuring the US against other G7 countries on progress in eliminating fossil fuel subsidies, the US ranked last, spending over $26 billion a year to prop up fossil fuels. Fossil fuel subsidies waste money and come at the expense of public health, local communities, and the climate. The US still provides subsidies for fossil fuel exploration, mining, production, and consumption. The US subsidizes more oil and gas… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

A Reliable Grid Relies on Coal

Author(s): Congressman Larry Bucshon, M.D. (R-IN-8)
U.S. House of Representatives
Member, Energy & Commerce Committee
Date: April 12, 2018 at 12:24 PM

It is critical that we ensure our nation enjoys a reliable and resilient grid, and that consumers continue to have access to affordable and reliable electricity. But today, coal-fired power generating plants are being closed at an alarming rate. Since 2010, plants representing almost 108,000 megawatts of coal-fired generating capacity have shut down or announced plans to close. Indiana alone ranks second among all states with 39 coal-fired electric generating plants having already retired. As a supporter of an all-the-above energy strategy, I believe that power generators should rely on a diverse mix of fuel sources. Coal-fired generation is one… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Can Small Modular Reactors Save Nuclear Power?

Author(s): Dr. Andrew C. Kadak
President
Kadak Associates, Inc.
Date: February 20, 2018 at 11:00 AM

Given the slow and somewhat painful shutdowns of perfectly good operating nuclear plants due to competitive pressures from low priced natural gas and subsidized solar and wind generation, is there a future for new nuclear power plants? The recent experience of cost overruns and schedule delays associated with the 4 large (1200 Mwe) nuclear plants being built now in Georgia and South Carolina is not reassuring. Actually, the two in South Carolina have been essentially cancelled by the owners due to these cost overruns and lack of electricity demand. While natural gas is cleaner than coal from an emissions standpoint,… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

FERC Rejects DOE Resilience Rulemaking

Author(s): Devin Hartman
President & CEO
The Electricity Consumers Resource Council
Date: January 16, 2018 at 10:15 AM

On January 8, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) voted unanimously to reject the Department of Energy’s (DOE) proposed rulemaking on grid reliability and resilience pricing. The rule would have provided cost recovery to power plants holding 90 days of on-site fuel supply. Only nuclear and select coal facilities would have qualified. Rather than create a new power market product or refine the pricing rules of existing products, the proposal departed from principles of electricity market design by subsidizing power plants with a specific characteristic. FERC’s ruling confirmed that both the goal – promoting 90 days of on-site fuel –… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Pricing Grid Resiliency: A Lifeline for Coal and Nuclear?

Author(s): Alex Gilbert
Cofounder
Spark Library
Date: October 23, 2017 at 10:15 AM

In late September, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for consideration by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Using §403, a little-used provision in the DOE Organization Act of 1977, Secretary Perry proposed that FERC, an independent agency, exercise its authority to establish just and reasonable rates for wholesale electricity sales. Specifically, the NOPR requires ISO’s and RTO’s create special cost of service compensation for certain types of generation that DOE alleges are essential to protecting grid reliability and resiliency. Facilities would be eligible for this special, non-market compensation if they could provide essential… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Coa l information: Overview

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: August 3, 2017 at 10:41 AM

Full Title: Coal information: Overview Author(s): International Energy Agency Publication Date: 2017 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Coal Information 2017 provides a comprehensive review of historical and current market trends in the world coal sector, including 2016 provisional data. It provides a review of the world coal market in 2016, alongside a statistical overview of developments, which covers world coal production and coal reserves, coal demand by type, coal trade and coal prices for the 35 OECD member countries and for 22 major non-OECD coal- producing and -consuming countries. This overview from Coal Information 2017 contains a summary of the… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Will Trump’s Plan To Bring Back Coal Jobs Work?

Author(s): Greg Gershuny
Interim Director, Energy and Environment Program
The Aspen Institute
Date: April 10, 2017 at 12:00 PM

Coal isn’t coming back although with real investment in carbon capture and sequestration, it could continue to contribute to a clean energy economy. In 2006, coal accounted for nearly half of all electricity in the US; by 2016, it was down to 29%. The decrease in coal by the electricity sector is because of economic reasons, as it has been outcompeted by low cost natural gas. Building new wind and utility scale solar generation is less expensive than building new coal plants, even without subsidies. States are already decarbonizing. The Clean Power Plan, the Environmental Protection Agency’s regulation to limit… [more]

View Discussion