Search Results for coal
63 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Commodity Market Impacts of EPA’s Clean Power Plan

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 15, 2015 at 2:26 PM

Full Title: Commodity Market Impacts of EPA’s Clean Power Plan Author(s): Trevor Houser, John Larsen, Sarah Ladislaw, Michelle Melton, Whitney Ketchum, and Shashank Mohan Publisher(s): Center for International Strategic Studies Publication Date: 02/2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): On June 2, 2014 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its draft Clean Power Plan (CPP), a proposed rule to regulate carbon dioxide from the nation’s existing fossil fuel-fired generation facilities. As the central pillar of the Obama Administration’s strategy for addressing climate change, the draft rule’s release was both highly anticipated and contentious. New York-based economic research firm Rhodium Group (RHG)… [more]

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Optimization of Carbon-Capture-Enabled Coal-Gas-Solar Power Generation

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 20, 2015 at 11:03 AM

Full Title: Optimization of Carbon-Capture-Enabled Coal-Gas-Solar Power Generation Author(s): Philip G. Brodrick, Charles A. Kang, Adam R. Brandt, Louis J. Durlofsky Publisher(s): Elsevier Publication Date: Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): 12/2014 Computational optimization is used to determine the optimal design and time-varying operations of a carbon dioxide capture retrofit to a coal-fired power plant. The retrofit consists of an amine-based temperature-swing absorption system, to which process steam is supplied from an auxiliary unit. Two candidate auxiliary heat sources are explored: natural gas and solar thermal. The NPV (net present value) of the retrofitted facility is maximized to determine which auxiliary… [more]

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Discussion

Can We Find a Future for Coal?

Author(s): Mark Drajem
Editor
Bloomberg's First Word Energy
Date: February 12, 2015 at 9:00 AM

Coal can’t get much love. Cheap natural gas and a bevy of EPA regulations are conspiring to force old coal plants to close and pushing U.S. production down to less than one billion short tons, near a two-decade low. While low-cost production in Wyoming and Illinois has been able to hold steady, the legacy mines of Appalachia face devastating losses in production and jobs. Meanwhile, projects that were supposed to demonstrate a future for coal in a carbon-constrained world are struggling or dead. The Obama administration pulled the plug on the FutureGen clean coal project this month. Another similar project… [more]

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Did EPA Get it Right on Coal Ash?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 31, 2014 at 12:45 PM

On December 22, 2008, a disposal cell at the TVA Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing an estimated 5.4 million cubic yards of fly ash in eastern Tennessee. Fly ash is one of a variety of coal combustion residuals (CCR), collectively referred to as coal ash and stored in more than 500 disposal facilities across the country. The Kingston spill prompted an EPA effort to reassess how coal ash is regulated. In the initial rule proposal, two different options for regulating coal ash were included, under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which regulates solid waste. The central question was… [more]

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How Can We Enhance The Efficiency Of The Existing Coal Power Plant Fleet?

Author(s): Janet Gellici
Chief Executive Officer
National Coal Council
Date: November 24, 2014 at 10:14 AM

The existing fleet of coal-fired power plants is critical to the economic prosperity of the U.S. As the leading provider of U.S. electricity generation (at 39%), low cost coal keeps electricity prices below those of other free market nations and provides a competitive edge for U.S industry. In addition, the “Polar Vortex” weather events of January and February 2014 demonstrated the contribution of the existing coal fleet to the reliability of the U.S. electricity grid. After limited natural gas resources were diverted from electricity production to residential heating needs, coal-fired power plants made up the difference. Nationwide, over 90% of… [more]

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Obama’s EPA to Cost Americans Billions of Dollars and Hundreds of Thousands of Jobs

Author(s): Former Congressman Ed Whitfield (R-KY)
Member
U.S. House of Representatives
Date: June 2, 2014 at 7:00 AM

As Chairman of the House Subcommittee on Energy and Power, I’m continuing the fight against President Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) overregulation of our nation’s power plants without any regard to the consequences for our economy and consumers. This week, the EPA is expected to release its proposed rule regulating carbon dioxide emissions from existing and modified electricity power plants. This effort is certain to result in a de facto cap and trade program, which Congress most recently rejected in 2009.  This regulation follows the proposed rule on new power plants, which essentially makes it illegal to build a power… [more]

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Can Shale Gas Limit Air Pollution?

Author(s): Richard Muller
Professor of Physics
University of Califoria at Berkeley
Date: May 15, 2014 at 7:15 AM

Some oppose shale gas because it is a fossil fuel, a source of carbon dioxide. Some are concerned by accounts of the fresh water it needs, by flaming faucets, by leaked “fugitive methane”, by pollution of the ground with fracking fluid and by damaging earthquakes. Although I believe that global warming is real, caused by humans, and a threat to our future, these concerns about shale gas are either largely false or can be addressed by appropriate regulation such as the controversial but ultimately positive developments in Illinois. Shale gas can not only reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but also reduce a deadly pollution known… [more]

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Discussion

Changing Times for Electric Utilities

Author(s): John Finnigan
Senior Regulatory Attorney
Environmental Defense Fund
Date: March 24, 2014 at 7:00 AM

Two seemingly unrelated announcements drew much attention in the electric utility industry recently. First, the Edison Electric Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council jointly recommended changing how utilities should be regulated. Second, Duke Energy announced it will sell 13 Midwest merchant power plants. These announcements are actually related, and arise because the traditional utility business model is crumbling, due to several factors: Load growth has declined, due to a slowing economy and greater use of renewable energy and energy efficiency. Utilities are no longer able to obtain economies of scale by building ever-larger plants. New regulations have resulted in… [more]

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Energy from the Earth: Practical geoscience to inform energy legislation

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 11, 2014 at 11:24 AM

Full Title: Energy from the Earth: Practical geoscience to inform energy legislation Author(s): Gene Whitney, Scott Tinker, Brenda Pierce Publisher(s): American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Association of Petroleum Geologists, American Geophysical Union, American Geosciences Institute, Association of American State Geologists, Geological Society of America, National Science Foundation—Directorate for Geosciences, U.S. Geological Survey Publication Date: 11/2013 Presentations from the briefing, which gave an overview of the series and US energy needs and supply: Gene Whitney ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Scott Tinker ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Brenda Pierce ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt):  Energy production and consumption supports modern life in the United States, and is integral to the economy, individual communities, and… [more]

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The Economic Impacts of Eliminating Coal from Our Energy Portfolio

Author(s): Former Congressman Ed Whitfield (R-KY)
Member
U.S. House of Representatives
Date: January 16, 2014 at 6:20 PM

Earlier this week, H.R. 3826, the “Electricity Security and Affordability Act,” which I co-authored with Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV), advanced through the House Energy and Power Subcommittee, by a vote of 18 to 11. This bipartisan, bicameral legislation provides a reasonable alternative to EPA’s proposed greenhouse gas standards for new power plants and the agency’s planned regulations for existing power plants.  It now moves to the full Energy and Commerce Committee for consideration. Under EPA’s proposal, industry would not even be able to build the most state-of-the-art clean coal-fired power plant, because the technology required under the proposed regulation is… [more]

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