Search Results for electricity-generation
13 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

If a Tree Falls in the Forest…Should We Use It to Generate Electricity?

Author(s): Meredith Fowlie
Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics
University of California, Berkeley
Date: September 27, 2016 at 11:30 AM

California is experiencing what has been dubbed the worst epidemic of tree mortality in the state’s modern history, with the death of an estimated 66 million trees since 2010. There seems to be widespread – but not unanimous – agreement that leaving close to 40 million dry tons of wood in the forest will increase wildfire risk to unacceptable levels. A tree-mortality task force is working to safely remove the dying trees, some of which can be harvested for timber. But given the current trajectory, lots of wood will be burned on-site. This begs the question: are we better off… [more]

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Discussion

Do We Have The Raw Materials For The World To Become 80% Renewable By 2050?

Author(s): James Conca
Senior Scientist
UFA Ventures, Inc.
Date: August 15, 2016 at 10:30 AM

There have been many voices lately saying that renewables could produce 80% or more of the world’s energy by 2050 in order to limit global warming to 2.5°C, as long as we develop sufficient energy storage and bring up efficiency and conservation. But the real issue is steel. It takes about 500 tons of steel and 1000 tons of concrete per MW of wind power. Even more to connect them to the grid. The United States has used 40 million tons of steel to build 48,800 wind turbines totaling 74,512 MW and costing about 150 billion dollars. Wind energy produces… [more]

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Discussion

Are Wholesale Electricity Markets Working?

Author(s): Alex Gilbert
Cofounder
Spark Library
Date: April 4, 2016 at 12:00 PM

In the last twenty years, the United States has been in the process of restructuring its electricity generation. Today, wholesale electric markets are controlled by regional transmission organizations (RTO) and independent system operators (ISO) that direct electric grid operations and run day-ahead and real-time pricing. These grid operators, which are regulated by FERC, now oversee more than two-thirds of America’s bulk power system and are meant to create value by improving system reliability and lowering electricity costs. However, there are serious questions about whether RTOs/ISOs are operating efficiently. Areas of concern include 1) whether reliability is improving and costs are… [more]

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Discussion

The Limits of Wind Power

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 13, 2016 at 11:51 PM

Full Title: The Limits of Wind Power Author(s): William Korchinski Publisher(s): Adam Smith Institute Publication Date: February 2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Environmentalists advocate wind power as one of the main alternatives to fossil fuels, claiming that it is both cost effective and low in carbon emissions. This study seeks to evaluate these claims. Existing estimates of the life-cycle emissions from wind turbines range from 5 to 100 grams of CO2 equivalent per kilowatt hour of electricity produced. This very wide range is explained by differences in what was included in each analysis, and the proportion of electricity… [more]

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Discussion

Renewable Electricity: Insights for the Coming Decade

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 11:00 PM

Full Title: Renewable Electricity: Insights for the Coming Decade Author(s): Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Publisher(s): Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Publication Date: 02/2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): A sophisticated set of renewable electricity (RE) generation technologies is now commercially available. Globally, RE captured approximately half of all capacity additions since 2011. The cost of RE is already competitive with fossil fuels in some areas around the world, and prices are anticipated to continue to decline over the next decade. RE options, led by wind and solar, are part of a suite of technologies and business… [more]

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Discussion

Tracking America’s Energy Bill

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 6, 2016 at 11:18 AM

Full Title: Tracking America’s Energy Bill Author(s): Trevor Houser Publisher(s): Rhodium Group Publication Date: 03/2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Energy costs are a key variable in US economic performance. Yet available data on how much Americans spend fueling their cars, heating their homes and lighting their offices either lags by a couple years or is incomplete. This month, we are introducing the RHG Energy Meter, a more timely and inclusive estimate of US energy expenditures. This note provides an overview of the indicator and discusses how America’s energy bill has changed over the past couple years.

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Discussion

Clean Energy Partners: Solutions for Energy Security and Economic Growth

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 19, 2015 at 3:59 PM

Full Title: Clean Energy Partners: Solutions for Energy Security and Economic Growth Author(s): Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE) Publisher(s): Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE) Publication Date: 2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Reliable and affordable energy is a fundamental part of our lives. Energy is needed to provide heat, light and cooking in our homes; it is used for communication, transportation and industrial processes; and it is the engine that supports our country’s economy. Reliable and affordable clean energy options address two of our nation’s most pressing challenges: economic growth and energy security. The Business Council for Sustainable… [more]

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Discussion

Dynamic Distribution System: Transforming the Grid from the Distribution System Out

Author(s): Gary Radloff
Director of Midwest Energy Policy Analysis
Wisconsin Energy Institute
Date: November 19, 2014 at 7:12 AM

This prompt is the first in a series of discussions led by invited speakers at the upcoming 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change to be held January 27-29, 2015 in Washington, DC. The environmental benefits and declining price of solar, wind, storage and other distributed energy resources are driving their increased use in the electrical utility system. As a result, more power is being generated at homes, businesses, and commercial buildings and used locally. This jump in power production at the distribution level presents a challenge to the traditional electrical… [more]

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Discussion

Nuclear Power’s Role in Responding to Climate Change

Author(s): Dr. Andrew C. Kadak
President
Kadak Associates, Inc.
Date: June 19, 2014 at 12:10 PM

Without significant gains in storage technology, electric generation from solar and wind will not meet the world’s energy needs. Nuclear power, however, can deliver electric power in a sufficiently safe, economical and secure manner to supplement supply from other carbon-free sources. Despite this, there remain major objections to the safety, cost, waste management and proliferation risk of nuclear power, which I’ll seek to address here. Safety There have been three serious accidents that challenged the safety record of nuclear power: the Three Mile Island (TMI), Chernobyl, and the tsunami-induced Fukushima accident. In all these accidents there were no immediate public… [more]

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Discussion

Hydropower: The Silent and Aging Renewable

Author(s): Nate Sandvig
President
Clean Energy Development, LLC
Date: April 28, 2014 at 10:53 AM

Often termed the country’s “silent renewable,” hydropower is the nation’s largest renewable electricity resource, providing 7% of total generation. Hydropower’s many supporters – 81% of U.S. voters favor maintaining existing hydro, according to a recent National Hydropower Association poll – value its low-cost, reliability and ability to integrate intermittent renewable resources.  Critics argue that hydropower is not environmentally-friendly and, if included in state Renewable Portfolio Standards, will reduce the growth of renewables like wind and solar power. Historically, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation built the vast majority of major federal dams with integrated hydroelectric… [more]

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