Search Results for energy-demand
4 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Executive Summary)

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: August 31, 2015 at 3:13 PM

Full Title: Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Executive Summary) Author(s): Trieu Mai, Debra Sandor, Ryan Wiser, and Thomas Schneider1 Publisher(s): National Renewable Energy Study (NREL) Publication Date: 2012 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): The National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL) Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) is an initial investigation of the extent to which renewable energy supply can meet the electricity demands of the continental United States over the next several decades. This study explores the implications and challenges of very high renewable electricity generation levels—from 30% up to 90%, focusing on 80%, of all U.S. electricity generation—in 2050. At such… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Metrics for Comparing Alternative Liquid Fuels

Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: February 20, 2014 at 7:04 AM

It is clear that the Age of Oil is winding down. Worldwide, the rate of discovery of new oil reserves peaked in the 1960s and in the US our peak rate of oil discovery occurred in the early 1930s. In recent years the world has used about three barrels of oil for every barrel of new oil reserves discovered. Thus we are living largely on past oil discoveries. There is still a lot of oil in the world, and we will still be using a lot of oil decades from now. But it will be increasingly expensive both economically and… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

Managing Energy Demand: Can We? Should We?

Author(s): Marilyn Brown
Professor of Public Policy
Georgia Institute of Technology
Date: January 23, 2014 at 11:20 AM

Energy efficiency has been a lightning rod in the debate about the cost of addressing climate change, because it is generally seen as a least-cost approach to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. But the mere mention of possible “negative costs” associated with energy efficiency is enough to send shock waves across the profession of neoclassical economics. Experts continue to disagree about the magnitude, cost and possibility of managing demand. Some say that the future potential for energy efficiency is limited because markets have already exploited all cost-effective opportunities, and there are insurmountable obstacles to further expansion. Demand-side resources may have played… [more]

View Discussion
Discussion

How Much (And What Kind) of Energy Is Enough?



Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: April 22, 2013 at 4:05 PM

High energy use (power consumption) increases wealth, health and education levels. Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, most energy has come from fossil fuels: coal, oil and natural gas. Whatever the eventual lifetimes of these fossil energy resources, they are not renewable. Sooner or later, fossil energy will not be available to underpin our prosperity. Thus non-renewable energy is not a long-term option. We must have renewable energy if we are to maintain high living standards among advanced economies, and if more people in developing nations are to access enough energy to develop their human potential. But how much… [more]

View Discussion