Search Results for energy-economics
23 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

EFI and NASEO Release 2018 U.S. Energy and Employment Report

Author(s): David Foster
Distinguished Associate
Energy Futures Initiative
Date: May 21, 2018 at 2:00 PM

On May 16th, The Energy Futures Initiative (EFI) and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) released the 2018 U.S. Energy and Employment Report (USEER). The USEER offers data on employment trends in four key energy sectors – Electric Power Generation and Fuels; Transmission, Distribution and Storage; Energy Efficiency and; Motor Vehicles. This is the third installment of the energy jobs survey established by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2016. Overall, firms covered by the survey anticipate roughly 6.2 percent employment growth for 2018. Energy Efficiency employers project the highest growth rate over 2018 (9 percent), followed by… [more]

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Rediscovering the Energy-Economy Connection

Author(s): Carey King
Assistant Director
University of Texas Energy Institute
Date: June 23, 2016 at 10:30 AM

The world has experienced profound changes recently regarding energy and the economy. Fossil fuels, while still abundant, are becoming more costly to develop as the most easily-accessible resources become depleted. Many renewable energy technologies are becoming less costly due in part to market forces as well as supportive state and federal energy policies. These technologies however would require massive capital investment to replace fossil fuels at current scale. Global demand for energy continues to climb while advanced economies are becoming less energy-intensive when measured per unit of GDP. Meanwhile, a global financial crisis as well as mounting public and private… [more]

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Linking Renewable Energy to Rural Development

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 24, 2016 at 3:08 PM

Full Title: Linking Renewable Energy to Rural Development Author(s): Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Publisher(s): Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Publication Date: 01/2012 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Renewable energy (hereafter, RE) is being championed as a potentially significant new source of jobs and rural growth in OECD countries, and a means of addressing environmental and energy security concerns. In most countries, governments have invested large amounts of public money to support RE development and are requiring significant quantities of it to be sold by energy providers. But what are the economic impacts of these… [more]

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U.S. Energy Efficiency Potential Through 2035

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 2:32 PM

Full Title: U.S. Energy Efficiency Potential Through 2035 Author(s): Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Publisher(s): Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Publication Date: 04/2014 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Electricity plays an integral role in supporting the standard of living to which Americans have grown accustom, enabling comfort, convenience, health and safety, security, and productivity in its traditional end-use applications, including air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, and motive power. Moreover, the computational and communications infrastructure associated with our digital economy depends on electricity – from powering data centers to charging ever- proliferating mobile electronic devices. Understanding growth in demand is key… [more]

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The ‘Shale Gas Revolution’: Developments and Changes

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 2:18 PM

Full Title: Author(s): Publisher(s): Publication Date: Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): In September 2010, Chatham House published a report by this author entitled The ‘Shale Gas Revolution’: Hype and Reality. The report, after describing the ‘shale gas revolution’ in the United States, then considered two key questions: could the revolution continue there and could it be replicated elsewhere? The answers to both questions were ambivalent. The resulting uncertainty was beginning to inhibit investment in conventional and unconventional gas. Thus the report argued that in five to ten years’ time, given that gas demand would continue to grow, there could… [more]

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Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels: Influence of Crude Oil Price and Technology Maturity

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 22, 2015 at 2:36 PM

Full Title: Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels: Influence of Crude Oil Price and Technology Maturity Author(s): Pierpaolo Cazzola, Geoff Morrison, Hiroyuki Kaneko, François Cuenot, Abbas Ghandi and Lewis Fulton Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): This study examines the production costs of a range of transport fuels and energy carriers under varying crude oil price assumptions and technology market maturation levels. It uses an engineering “bottom‐up” approach to estimate the effect of both the input cost of oil and various technological assumptions on the finished price of these fuels. In total, the… [more]

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Forecasting the limits to the availability and diversity of global conventional oil supply: Validation

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 12, 2015 at 2:04 PM

Full Title: Forecasting the limits to the availability and diversity of global conventional oil supply: Validation Author(s): John L. Hallock Jr., Wei Wu, Charles A.S. Hall, Michael Jefferson Publisher(s): Elsevier, Energy Policy Publication Date: 2014 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Oil and related products continue to be prime enablers of the maintenance and growth of nearly all of the world’s economies. The dramatic increase in the price of oil through mid-2008, along with the coincident (and possibly resultant) global recession, highlight our continued vulnerability to future limitations in the supply of cheap oil. The very large differences between the various… [more]

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What Do Falling Oil Prices Mean for Policymakers?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: January 8, 2015 at 3:50 PM

Oil prices have declined sharply over the last six months, with the U.S. benchmark closing below $50/barrel on Jan. 6th, for the first time since 2009.  A number of factors have contributed to this fall in prices, including an increase in U.S. tight oil production and decreased global demand. Beyond the immediate financial benefits of lower fuel prices for U.S. consumers, the falling price of oil raises several policy questions.  Impacts on financial markets and geopolitical tensions that could be exacerbated if the low price persists are only a few of the potential issues U.S.  policymakers may find themselves dealing… [more]

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The Challenges Of Integrating Renewables On To The Grid

Author(s): Duncan Callaway
Assistant Professor, Energy and Resources Group
University of California, Berkeley
Date: August 14, 2014 at 9:20 AM

Wind and solar capacity have grown significantly in the last decade, and many believe that significant reductions in carbon emissions require continued expansion of their capacity (see for example recent papers by Jim Williams et al and Jimmy Nelson et al[1]). With the declining cost of wind and solar, the economic case for increasing production from sources whose fuel is free is getting better. But getting these energy sources on to the grid is not without its engineering and economic challenges. Wind and solar production is both variable and uncertain, and grid system operators need to make sure they have… [more]

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Would a carbon tax effectively combat climate change?

Author(s): Lee Lane
Visiting Fellow
Hudson Institute
Date: July 24, 2014 at 9:30 AM

A number of scholars, from the left and the right have floated versions of a carbon tax. Henry Paulson has also weighed in, favoring a tax. In theory, a uniform comprehensive carbon tax enforced among all major global emitters might have great advantages. Such a tax, if linked to a stringent accounting system, could be more transparent than any other approach to greenhouse gas control. In contrast to command-and-control schemes, a tax would target abatement resources to where they would be most cost-effective. A tax, unlike the 2009  cap-and-trade bill, would make it harder for proponents to falsely promise both… [more]

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