Search Results for energy-economics
22 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Simplifying the Energy Tax Code

Author(s): Ryan Abraham
Senior Tax Counsel
United States Senate Committee on Finance
Date: February 3, 2014 at 8:19 AM

As part of his efforts to comprehensively reform the tax code, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-MT) released a staff discussion draft on December 18, 2013 that proposed a dramatically simpler set of energy tax incentives that are technology-neutral, more predictable, and promote cleaner energy that is made in the United States. Policymakers have included tax breaks for energy in the tax code for nearly one hundred years. These incentives were created with good intentions to create jobs, promote energy security, and help reduce air pollution and environmental damage. But over the years, the number of provisions has ballooned… [more]

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Discussion

Should the Crude Oil Export Ban Be Lifted?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 19, 2013 at 10:30 AM

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz recently acknowledged that it may be time to lift the ban on exporting crude oil, a comment that elicited a flurry of support and opposition toward the idea and highlighted the need for a thorough debate on the issue. The ban was enacted in 1975, along with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, as an energy supply security measure in response to the Arab oil embargoes. Since that time, the US energy landscape has changed and many are calling for a review of potentially outdated policies. “Those restrictions on exports were borne, as was the Department of Energy… [more]

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Discussion

Should U.S. Climate Policy Focus More on Innovation?

Author(s): Matthew Stepp
Senior Policy Analyst
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
Date: October 23, 2013 at 9:00 AM

Most clean energy advocates believe that the world has all the low-carbon technologies needed to effectively address climate change. In their view – what we describe as the Clean Energy Deployment Consensus – the world doesn’t need technology breakthroughs, but political breakthroughs to drive widespread deployment of clean energy technologies. This translates to a policy environment heavily weighted towards deployment subsidies, mandates, and carbon prices. But The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (ITIF) argues in its new report, “Challenging the Clean Energy Deployment Consensus,” that the world needs a more comprehensive Innovation Consensus that focuses on developing and deploying affordable… [more]

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Discussion

How Should We Make Decisions About Coal and LNG Exports?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: July 2, 2013 at 2:54 PM

A recent hearing of the Energy and Power Subcommittee discussed the regulatory, market and legal barriers to exporting Coal and LNG.  Critical issues were the length of time associated with the permitting process as well as the economic and climate impacts associated with the exports.  Christopher Smith, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary and Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy at the DOE, testified that most of the foundation has been built and that future approvals should be expedited.  Jeff Wright, Director, Office of Energy Projects at FERC, stated that many of the delays experienced were the result of filers submitting incomplete… [more]

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Discussion

Can We Make Energy Policy Without Water Policy?

Author(s): Elias Hinckley
Partner
KL Gates
Date: May 30, 2013 at 10:28 AM

Energy and water are linked in many ways. Most energy production requires huge amounts of fresh water, while the consumption of water for domestic and agricultural demands uses large amounts of energy. Future water availability, whether from long distance transport or desalination, will require even greater amounts of energy. Water scarcity, especially in the U.S. west of the Mississippi River, as well as in the Southeast, has become a growing source of concern and tension. Consequently, water availability is becoming an important consideration for energy projects in certain regions. The potential for the demand for water to outstrip available supply… [more]

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Discussion

Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act of 2013

Author(s): Floyd DesChamps
Senior Vice President of Policy & Research
Alliance to Save Energy
Date: April 29, 2013 at 11:27 AM

Senators Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) and Rob Portman (R-Ohio) recently reintroduced the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act (ESICA), S. 761. This bipartisan legislation will spur the use of energy efficiency technologies across residential, commercial and industrial sectors, while fostering job creation. Energy efficiency is the best way to address our energy needs, increase the competitiveness of our businesses and create sustainable jobs. ESICA is supported by over 200 entities, from industry to environmentalists, ranging from Dow Chemical to the Sierra Club. This broad support illustrates the value of identifying points of consensus and how energy efficiency is such an area… [more]

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Discussion

Important Energy Figures in President Obama’s 2014 Budget

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 16, 2013 at 1:30 PM

President Obama’s fiscal year 2014 budget, released April 10th, contains many of the energy initiatives previously outlined in his Energy Blueprint. Programs such as the Race to the Top energy efficiency challenge and the Energy Security Trust are included, along with slight adjustments to the enacted budgets of the primary agencies that shape energy policy – the Department of Energy, the Department of the Interior, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Specifically, the DOE budget would see total funding growth of 8%, with funding for energy efficiency and renewable energy increasing 40%. The DOI budget would increase 4%, and include an… [more]

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Discussion

The End of Cheap Oil and How It Is Changing Our World

Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: February 7, 2013 at 12:40 PM

The last century can rightly be called the Age of (Inexpensive or ‘Cheap’) Oil as world oil consumption grew from about 20 million tons per year in 1900 to just under 400 million tons per year in 2005. Since 2005, however, world oil consumption has been nearly constant despite high demand and record high oil prices, which indicates that we simply cannot produce oil any faster. And since oil is not renewable, eventually the production (and therefore the consumption) of oil must decline. Declining oil production will be an extremely painful reality for the U.S. because not only does the… [more]

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Discussion

Is Your State the Most Vulnerable to Gas Prices?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 28, 2012 at 9:36 AM

NRDC’s recently released report ranks states in two critical areas related to our nation’s continuing addiction to oil: gas price vulnerability – calculated as the percentage of personal income spent on gasoline by the average driver in each state – and state’s adoptions of solutions to reduce oil dependence. The report yields some conclusions: All states are impacted by oil dependence, but some states’ drivers are hit harder economically than others. The top 6 states most vulnerable to gas prices are Mississippi, West Virginia, South Carolina, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Texas, with the average drivers in these states spending 7.3-9% of… [more]

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Economist: High Oil Prices Not (Necessarily) Bad for Economy

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 6, 2012 at 8:22 AM

In a Yardeni Research blog post highlighted by an article in the New York Times, economist Ed Yardeni argued that rising oil prices “may actually be good for the stock market, up to a point.” This is due, in part, to energy sector companies like Chevron and Exxon making up more than 12% of the S&P 500’s market capitalization. Yardeni notes that since late 2008 there has been “a strong positive correlation between energy prices and the stock market.” If prices continue to rise, however, the odds of that positive effect lasting diminishes. “At some point,” Yardeni told the Times,… [more]

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