Search Results for energy-markets
11 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

The Problem with Renewable Energy Subsidies

Author(s): Cutter González
Energy Project Campaign Manager, Policy Analyst
Texas Public Policy Foundation
Date: December 3, 2018 at 11:37 AM

The Production Tax Credit (PTC), a federal subsidy for renewable energy, is a $24-per-megawatt-hour credit based on energy production rather than demand. That means those who produce renewable energy can receive the credit regardless of whether or not that electricity is actually needed. The incentive is so immense that at peak hours of output wind producers can actually pay retail electric providers, the companies that deliver the energy to homes and businesses, to take their product. This “negative pricing” scheme caused by the PTC and other subsidies is having serious consequences.The instability it causes can push out the energy producers that… [more]

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Discussion

Renewable Electricity: Insights for the Coming Decade

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 13, 2016 at 11:00 PM

Full Title: Renewable Electricity: Insights for the Coming Decade Author(s): Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Publisher(s): Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Publication Date: 02/2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): A sophisticated set of renewable electricity (RE) generation technologies is now commercially available. Globally, RE captured approximately half of all capacity additions since 2011. The cost of RE is already competitive with fossil fuels in some areas around the world, and prices are anticipated to continue to decline over the next decade. RE options, led by wind and solar, are part of a suite of technologies and business… [more]

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Discussion

The New Energy Landscape

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 8, 2015 at 11:26 AM

Full Title: The New Energy Landscape Author(s): Goldman Sachs Publisher(s): Goldman Sachs Publication Date: 04/2014 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Less than a decade ago, the global energy forecast seemed bleak. Global demand quickly outpaced new sources of supply, driving oil’s march toward an unprecedented high of $145 per barrel. Rising prices put downward pressure on global economic growth, and many countries, including the U.S., were largely dependent on foreign supplies. In 2006, the U.S. — the world’s largest consumer — imported 56 percent of its total oil consumption. Fear of geopolitical events impacting access to energy increased, along with concerns… [more]

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Focus on Energy Security: Costs, Benefits and Financing of Holding Emergency Oil Stocks

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 23, 2015 at 10:36 AM

Full Title: Focus on Energy Security: Costs, Benefits and Financing of Holding Emergency Oil Stocks Author(s): Jan Stelter and Yuichiro Nishida Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Oil is traded in a market where uncertainty, price volatility, and sudden supply disruptions are common characteristics. Natural disasters, political disagreements and wars can seriously affect supply and demand, and consequently economic activity. One particularly powerful tool of IEA member countries to respond to such disruptions is emergency oil stocks. In its history the IEA released stocks on three occasions, reducing supply shortfalls and the associated… [more]

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What Do Falling Oil Prices Mean for Policymakers?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: January 8, 2015 at 3:50 PM

Oil prices have declined sharply over the last six months, with the U.S. benchmark closing below $50/barrel on Jan. 6th, for the first time since 2009.  A number of factors have contributed to this fall in prices, including an increase in U.S. tight oil production and decreased global demand. Beyond the immediate financial benefits of lower fuel prices for U.S. consumers, the falling price of oil raises several policy questions.  Impacts on financial markets and geopolitical tensions that could be exacerbated if the low price persists are only a few of the potential issues U.S.  policymakers may find themselves dealing… [more]

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Discussion

The Challenges Of Integrating Renewables On To The Grid

Author(s): Duncan Callaway
Assistant Professor, Energy and Resources Group
University of California, Berkeley
Date: August 14, 2014 at 9:20 AM

Wind and solar capacity have grown significantly in the last decade, and many believe that significant reductions in carbon emissions require continued expansion of their capacity (see for example recent papers by Jim Williams et al and Jimmy Nelson et al[1]). With the declining cost of wind and solar, the economic case for increasing production from sources whose fuel is free is getting better. But getting these energy sources on to the grid is not without its engineering and economic challenges. Wind and solar production is both variable and uncertain, and grid system operators need to make sure they have… [more]

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Should U.S. Energy Policy Aim For “Stability” Or “Leverage” In Global Energy Markets?

Author(s): Robert Grant
Director of International Public Policy and Advocacy
Global Innovation Policy Center, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Date: November 20, 2013 at 7:10 AM

The United States is set to become the world’s number one producer of oil and gas combined. But since the oil crises of the 1970s, U.S. energy policy has been based, either implicitly or explicitly, on the assumption of scarcity of U.S. resources. This has resulted in strong support for open and transparent global energy markets, which are expected to reduce volatile (and high) prices for U.S. customers and enable U.S. companies to access foreign energy supplies. What policy makers now have to reckon with is what the re-discovery of a bounty of domestic supplies (of oil and gas) means for U.S. energy policy,… [more]

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Is Net Metering a Sustainable Policy for Utility Customers?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 15, 2013 at 10:57 AM

A battle is heating up in California regarding the State’s net metering policy as the California Public Utilities Commission is reviewing the policy’s costs and benefits.  Net metering is an incentive that allows consumers who produce their own electricity, from rooftop solar panels for example, to sell excess back to the grid (often) at full retail price. Opponents of net metering contend that the volumetric retail rate includes fixed costs that are essential to the long-term stability of our utility infrastructure. They claim that net metering customers get the benefit of using the grid, but pay less to do so… [more]

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Energy Industry Applauds CFTC Rule

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: July 18, 2012 at 4:07 PM

The U.S. Commodities Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) has issued their final definitions of financial products regulated under the Dodd-Frank Act. The rule maintains that forward contracts, which cover delivery of physical goods and, according to Platts, currently constitute most energy market trades are not swaps, which are purely financial exchanges. Examples of forward contracts in energy markets include environmental commodities, peak supply contracts, tolling agreements and many natural gas supply contracts. The ruling is significant because it keeps much of energy market outside of the jurisdiction of the CFTC, which is expanded by the Dodd-Frank Act. The ruling has been been called… [more]

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Discussion

What’s Wrong with Energy Efficiency?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 21, 2012 at 7:35 AM

In a response to a New York Times ‘Room for Debate’ forum on energy efficiency, Cato Institute scholar Peter Van Doren argues that energy efficiency standards are problematic, and that the most effective way to reduce fossil fuel use is to tax fossil fuels to increase their price. Van Doren writes “if fossil fuel combustion produces byproducts that cause negative health effects on third parties as well as changes in the temperature of the atmosphere, the obvious lesson from economics is to increase fossil fuel prices enough through taxation to account for these effects. Then firms and consumers will react… [more]

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