Search Results for fusion
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Discussion

Will Fusion Realize Its Potential?

Author(s): Michael S. Lubell
Professor of Physics
City College of the City University of New York
Date: April 2, 2012 at 6:16 AM

For decades many have considered nuclear fusion to be the brass ring of energy technologies, believing that – were it to be successful and commercially viable – it would offer sustained electricity production with no CO2, particulate pollution, or radioactive waste. Research into safely and consistently harnessing fusion’s potential for civil use has been ongoing since the mid-Twentieth Century. Yet to date no viable commercial applications have been developed. Two prominent fusion research efforts – ITER and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) – are facing potential problems. ITER may be at risk of diminished U.S. funding due to tightening Congressional… [more]

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Discussion

Discussion Catalyst: Global Warming Research Priorities

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 17, 2011 at 4:16 PM

[Note: The statements below are intended solely to stimulate discussion among the Expert community, and do not represent the position of OurEnergyPolicy.org. Text in italics indicates clarification or expansion.]   Research must help us to find the solution to GHG emissions from electricity generation. Given the current technologies and the growth rate of the developing countries (based mostly on coal), we need new technologies that when ready can be implemented as government policies. We strongly recommend increasing the research grants for global warming with emphasis on solutions. Therefore, the federal government should allocate special research funds for short term solutions… [more]

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Discussion

Discussion Catalyst: Electricity Generation Principles

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 4:05 PM

[Note: The statements below are intended solely to stimulate discussion among the Expert community, and do not represent the position of OurEnergyPolicy.org. Text in italics indicates clarification or expansion.]   US electricity generation should be based on the following sources: Hydroelectric — part of the stable supply base — not expected to grow. Large hydro capacity may shrink due to reservoir siltation, water shortages, and dam removal. Coal — part of the stable supply base — is domestically abundant. Currently, the cheapest but most carbon intensive solution. Growth rate depends on friendlier GHG technologies (like IGCC and CCS). The main… [more]

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