Search Results for infrastructure
13 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Energy Security Must Be High On The Agenda

Author(s): Congressman Fred Upton (R-MI)
Chairman of the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy
U.S. House of Representatives
Date: August 27, 2018 at 10:45 AM

Whether it’s the flip of a light switch or plugging in your cell phone to charge – never has the reliability of our energy supply been more important to so much in our daily lives. That also means never has energy infrastructure been a greater potential target for an attack. It is indisputable that ensuring the reliable and uninterrupted supply of fuels and electricity is absolutely essential to our nation’s economy, security, and the health and safety of its citizens. However, as our energy infrastructure has become more complex and society has grown more dependent on this infrastructure, safeguarding it… [more]

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Discussion

What Cybersecurity Means for The Grid

Author(s): Adam Hahn
Assistant Professor, EECS
Washington State University
Date: May 7, 2018 at 11:02 AM

Cybersecurity threats to the electric grid are no longer hypothetical.  While attacks impacting grid operations have only been reported in Ukraine, DHS recently identified intrusions into the U.S. grid. Fortunately, substantial progress has been made in recent years to protect the grid.  While the North American Energy Reliability Corporation (NERC) has implemented bulk grid cybersecurity requirements for the past decade, state utility commissions are increasingly defining requirements for low-voltage distribution grids.  Furthermore, NERC-led initiatives, such as national response exercises (GridEX) and information sharing programs (E-ISAC) help ensure utilities are prepared to respond to similar events.  At the federal level, the… [more]

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Discussion

Innovation and the Next Generation Utility: Embracing the New Energy Ecosystem

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 20, 2016 at 8:19 PM

Full Title: Innovation and the Next Generation Utility: Embracing the New Energy Ecosystem Author(s): PA Consulting Publication Date: 2016 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): In this paper, we explain how utilities will be better positioned to participate in the Dynamic Energy system if they focus on three key competencies: Business Model Innovation, Technology Innovation, and Cultural Innovation. The benefits of taking this three-pronged approach to innovation are clear. Doing nothing will lead to further declines in revenue and a loss of market share to third-party energy providers. Developing an innovation strategy – either company-wide or within specific teams – means… [more]

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Discussion

Protecting the U.S. Electric Power Grid from Attack

Author(s): Dawn Santoianni
Lead Communications Consultant
Duke Energy
Date: October 13, 2015 at 7:00 AM

Industry experts recently testified before Congress that more needs to be done to protect the nation’s electric grid from natural disasters, cyberattacks, physical threats and planned sabotage. Recent news stories have highlighted cybersecurity issues, including analysis by USA Today that claims the U.S. Department of Energy’s computer systems were compromised more than 150 times between 2010-2014. And while cybersecurity is a persistent threat, physical damage to “critical infrastructure” facilities from severe storms, flooding, wildfires and even shootings has the potential for extensive and long-duration outages: Critical high-voltage substations, while representing only 3% of all substations, carry the bulk of the nation’s… [more]

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Discussion

Natural Gas and Reliability

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 8, 2015 at 12:03 PM

Full Title: Natural Gas and Reliability Author(s): America’s Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) Publisher(s): America’s Natural Gas Alliance (ANGA) Publication Date: 05/2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): The electric utility industry, regulators and policymakers know that we need clean, efficient and affordable electricity to reduce emissions and strengthen our economy. Clean, abundant and affordable natural gas is ready to play an even greater role in the diverse mix of energy sources that will power America’s future. As we contemplate our energy choices, it’s worthwhile to consider a number of facts: As a result of the shale revolution, America has vast supplies… [more]

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Discussion

Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels: Influence of Crude Oil Price and Technology Maturity

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 22, 2015 at 2:36 PM

Full Title: Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels: Influence of Crude Oil Price and Technology Maturity Author(s): Pierpaolo Cazzola, Geoff Morrison, Hiroyuki Kaneko, François Cuenot, Abbas Ghandi and Lewis Fulton Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): This study examines the production costs of a range of transport fuels and energy carriers under varying crude oil price assumptions and technology market maturation levels. It uses an engineering “bottom‐up” approach to estimate the effect of both the input cost of oil and various technological assumptions on the finished price of these fuels. In total, the… [more]

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Discussion

Demand Response Can Save Billions

Author(s): James Conca
Senior Scientist
UFA Ventures, Inc.
Date: February 27, 2015 at 1:00 PM

Generally, when electricity demand rises in an area, we just fire up some source like a gas plant or a coal plant, or put more water through a hydroelectric dam, to produce more electricity to meet that demand. But what about other users voluntarily shifting their use to compensate for that rise in demand? This concept of Demand Response sounds simple, but until recent technological developments, like a smarter grid and rapid energy communication and control systems, it wasn’t feasible since the response time needed to be in minutes, not hours. Some users can shift their energy usage to different… [more]

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Discussion

Will There Be Sufficient Electricity?

Author(s): Herschel Specter
President
Micro-Utilities, Inc.
Date: September 11, 2014 at 9:56 AM

An analysis has been made to determine if there would be enough electricity in the US by 2050 to support a carbon-free future to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Assuming that carbon capture and sequestration is not practical, a mix of nuclear and renewable energy power plants was examined. Existing fossil power plants and nuclear plants represent 86% of the electricity that was produced in 2012. By 2050, to be carbon-free, all of these fossil plants would have to be phased out, while all present nuclear plants would have reached the end of their operating licenses. According to… [more]

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Discussion

Hydropower: The Silent and Aging Renewable

Author(s): Nate Sandvig
President
Clean Energy Development, LLC
Date: April 28, 2014 at 10:53 AM

Often termed the country’s “silent renewable,” hydropower is the nation’s largest renewable electricity resource, providing 7% of total generation. Hydropower’s many supporters – 81% of U.S. voters favor maintaining existing hydro, according to a recent National Hydropower Association poll – value its low-cost, reliability and ability to integrate intermittent renewable resources.  Critics argue that hydropower is not environmentally-friendly and, if included in state Renewable Portfolio Standards, will reduce the growth of renewables like wind and solar power. Historically, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation built the vast majority of major federal dams with integrated hydroelectric… [more]

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Discussion

Of Projections and Policies – Natural Gas and Transportation Fuels

Author(s): Marshall Kaplan
Advisor
Fuel Freedom Foundation
Date: January 11, 2013 at 11:45 AM

The recent projections for future energy consumption from Exxon Mobil’s report, “Outlook for Energy,” and the EIA’s “Annual Energy Outlook, 2013” essentially said the same thing concerning the potential for natural gas and its derivative methanol: Natural gas use now is only about 1 percent of the total fuel used in vehicles, and by 2040, it will only rise to 4 percent. This increase will take place in the trucking sector and liquefied natural gas (LNG). Owners of automobiles will not rush to natural gas, because of a lack of pumping stations and the low density of natural gas. Adam… [more]

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