Search Results for markets
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Discussion

Increasing U.S. Energy Security and Reducing Greenhouse Gases in the Transportation Sector: Electricity vs. Biofuels

Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: July 14, 2015 at 8:00 AM

U. S. renewable fuel policy has two primary objectives: 1) to reduce petroleum imports, increasing energy security and 2) to reduce greenhouse gas generation in the transportation sector. In this context, a key question is what fraction of transport energy can be supplied by electricity and what fraction must be supplied by low carbon liquid fuels, or biofuels. Two recent papers, one focused on the U.S. and another with a global perspective, show that the ability of electricity to serve the light duty fleet is much less than previously thought if both energy security and GHG reduction are to be… [more]

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Discussion

Tax Pollution, Not Profits

Author(s): Congressman John Delaney (D-MD)
Member
U.S. House of Representatives
Date: July 7, 2015 at 8:00 AM

Climate change is a threat to our environment and our economy, and we cannot afford the risk of inaction. With our free market economy, the best solution is a simple, transparent tax on carbon that unleashes the power of the market and enables America to lead the way toward a new, clean energy economy. Importantly, a carbon tax produces revenues that can be used to help American businesses and families. But there are many options for how to use these revenues. Critics of carbon taxes frequently cite slower economic growth, increasing taxes on the poor, and hurting coal workers as… [more]

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Discussion

Preparing the Next Generation of Energy Leaders

Author(s): Gernot Wagner
Lead Senior Economist
Environmental Defense Fund
Date: June 16, 2015 at 8:00 AM

What determines the cost of a ton of coal? Is OPEC an oligopoly? Should we subsidize low-carbon energy or tax fossil fuels? Do Prius owners drive more? These are among the questions I cover in my Economics of Energy class. I’ve taught this class at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs for the past five years. I hope to receive your feedback on how to improve this course. The course has two goals: to provide a set of tools to approach these and many other fundamental questions in energy economics, and to do so in plain English. Last… [more]

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Discussion

Falling Oil Prices: Implications in the United States

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 1, 2015 at 2:53 PM

Full Title: Falling Oil Prices: Implications in the United States Author(s): Stephen Brown Publisher(s): Resources for the Future Publication Date: 2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Although they have increased since hitting bottom in January, world oil prices are nearly $50 per barrel lower than in June 2014 as of this writing in March. The futures market shows the drop will be sustained but with gradual increases over the next five years. The decline in oil prices is the result of both weak demand and increased supply. World oil market participants gradually realized that weak economic activity in China, Japan, India,… [more]

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Discussion

The Role of Innovation in Meeting the EPA’s Clean Power Plan

Author(s): Peter Kelly-Detwiler
Principal
NorthBridge Energy Partners, LLC
Date: May 12, 2015 at 8:00 AM

The EPA’s proposed Clean Power Plan, meant to reduce carbon by 30% by 2030, is expected to be accomplished through a combination of improving existing power plants, switching to cleaner generation, boosting renewables, and improving energy efficiency. It is more than likely that the global economy’s ability to innovate and drive economies of scale will significantly ease this transition, providing as yet unknown but superior alternatives. Consider this: the wind and solar industries barely existed five years ago. Today, costs of wind have fallen by 58% in the last five years, and the price of installed solar has plummeted by… [more]

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Discussion

Focus on Energy Security: Costs, Benefits and Financing of Holding Emergency Oil Stocks

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 23, 2015 at 10:36 AM

Full Title: Focus on Energy Security: Costs, Benefits and Financing of Holding Emergency Oil Stocks Author(s): Jan Stelter and Yuichiro Nishida Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Oil is traded in a market where uncertainty, price volatility, and sudden supply disruptions are common characteristics. Natural disasters, political disagreements and wars can seriously affect supply and demand, and consequently economic activity. One particularly powerful tool of IEA member countries to respond to such disruptions is emergency oil stocks. In its history the IEA released stocks on three occasions, reducing supply shortfalls and the associated… [more]

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Discussion

IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 22, 2015 at 3:23 PM

Full Title: IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Author(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2012 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): The IEA Response to an Oil Supply Disruption: In the event of an actual or potentially severe oil supply disruption, the IEA Directorate of Energy Markets and Security assesses the market impact and the potential need for an IEA co-ordinated response. This market assessment includes an estimate of the additional production oil producers can bring to the market quickly, based on consultation with producer governments. Based on this assessment, the IEA Executive Director… [more]

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Discussion

Energy Technology Perspectives 2014: Harnessing Electricity’s Potential, Executive Summary

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 3:17 PM

Full Title: Energy Technology Perspectives 2014: Harnessing Electricity’s Potential Author(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2014 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Energy Technology Perspectives 2014 (ETP 2014) charts a course by which policy and technology together become driving forces – rather than reactionary tools – in transforming the energy sector over the next 40 years. Recent technology developments, markets and energy-related events have asserted their capacity to influence global energy systems. They have also reinforced the central role of policy in the increasingly urgent need to meet growing energy demand while addressing related concerns… [more]

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Discussion

Creating a Clean Energy Century

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 20, 2011 at 5:21 PM

Note: Synopsis from report‘s executive summary. Creating a Clean Energy Century: Recapturing the Lead in Clean Tech Innovation By Josh Freed, Sam Hodas, Sarah Collins, and Stephanie Praus While the energy market has always been driven by fossil fuels, it is moving slowly, but inevitably, toward clean energy as countries decide they can no longer tolerate the pollution costs and security risks of conventional energy or the threat of global warming. The great hurdle is making clean energy as cheap as fossil fuels. This will require major breakthroughs. Existing clean energy sources are too expensive and have technical limitations. The… [more]

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Discussion

The Future of Natural Gas: An Interdisciplinary MIT Study

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 5:20 PM

Note: Synopsis drawn from report’s executive summary. Synopsis intended solely for purposes of generating discussion. The Future of Natural Gas: An Interdisciplinary MIT Study By the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Energy Initiative Natural gas has moved to the center of the current debate on energy, security and climate. This study examines the role of natural gas in a carbon-constrained world, with a time horizon out to mid-century. The overarching conclusions are that: Abundant global natural gas resources imply greatly expanded natural gas use, with especially large growth in electricity generation. Natural gas will assume an increasing share of the U.S.… [more]

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