Search Results for natural-gas
109 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Simplifying the Energy Tax Code

Author(s): Ryan Abraham
Senior Tax Counsel
United States Senate Committee on Finance
Date: February 3, 2014 at 8:19 AM

As part of his efforts to comprehensively reform the tax code, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-MT) released a staff discussion draft on December 18, 2013 that proposed a dramatically simpler set of energy tax incentives that are technology-neutral, more predictable, and promote cleaner energy that is made in the United States. Policymakers have included tax breaks for energy in the tax code for nearly one hundred years. These incentives were created with good intentions to create jobs, promote energy security, and help reduce air pollution and environmental damage. But over the years, the number of provisions has ballooned… [more]

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What is the Economic Impact of the Domestic Oil and Natural Gas Boom?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: January 14, 2014 at 12:50 PM

The boom in oil and gas production in the United States has largely been heralded as a strong economic stimulus for the economy. For example, in an August 2013 interview, McKinsey partner Scott Nyquist outlined huge economic returns through increases in capital investment and jobs in the manufacturing sector. “This is an exciting game changer for the US economy,” said Nyquist. “It can create jobs through investment in the energy sector itself and through the ripple effects in other parts of the economy. It will increase the overall GDP of the country, which will increase the overall wealth and well-being… [more]

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Should U.S. Energy Policy Aim For “Stability” Or “Leverage” In Global Energy Markets?

Author(s): Robert Grant
Director of International Public Policy and Advocacy
Global Innovation Policy Center, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Date: November 20, 2013 at 7:10 AM

The United States is set to become the world’s number one producer of oil and gas combined. But since the oil crises of the 1970s, U.S. energy policy has been based, either implicitly or explicitly, on the assumption of scarcity of U.S. resources. This has resulted in strong support for open and transparent global energy markets, which are expected to reduce volatile (and high) prices for U.S. customers and enable U.S. companies to access foreign energy supplies. What policy makers now have to reckon with is what the re-discovery of a bounty of domestic supplies (of oil and gas) means for U.S. energy policy,… [more]

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Do Fugitive Emissions Undermine Natural Gas?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 11, 2013 at 8:18 AM

It has been recently suggested that natural gas is a more climate friendly alternative to many fossil fuels, and a necessary “bridge” to a low carbon future. The main component of natural gas is methane, which is a powerful GHG that has significantly more heat trapping potential than CO2. Natural gas is the cleanest burning fossil fuel, yet when it is extracted from the ground, unburned methane can escape into the atmosphere. Significant discussion has developed around the extent of these fugitive emissions and whether they undermine the climate benefits of using natural gas as a primary fuel. A 2011… [more]

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Should Nuclear Power Receive Environmental Subsidies?

Author(s): Dr. Andrew C. Kadak
President
Kadak Associates, Inc.
Date: September 18, 2013 at 11:01 AM

The availability of cheap natural gas in the United States has stalled the construction of new nuclear plants.  While four new nuclear plants are under construction in the US, many of the proposed 15 – 20 new plants were put on “hold” pending either an increase in electricity demand or increase in the price of natural gas. However, nuclear remains the largest source of emissions-free power in the U.S. at 19% of total electricity generation. The question posed for this dialogue is whether there is a justifiable reason to build new nuclear plants to provide base load power, despite the… [more]

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Electric and Natural Gas Vehicles — Heads You Win, Tails You Win

Author(s): Marshall Kaplan
Advisor
Fuel Freedom Foundation
Date: August 30, 2013 at 9:54 AM

Last week, the Tesla Model S, an electric-powered car, received the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s highest mark in its history of ranking cars. Consumers Reports granted the Tesla Model S ninety-nine out of 100 points in their overall measure of vehicles and Motor Trend magazine named the Model S the 2013 Car of the Year. While Tesla’s increasing appeal may lead the way toward increasing market penetration for electric vehicles (EVs) in the future, real competition, at the present time and for some time to come, will depend upon opening up the present-restrictive gasoline market to alternative fuels, like… [more]

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Discussion

Will MLPs Help Drive Renewable Energy Markets Forward?

Author(s): Andrea Luecke
Executive Director
The Solar Foundation
Date: July 30, 2013 at 11:33 AM

There is an investment vehicle available to oil and natural gas development that is not available to renewable energy resource projects.  There is a current effort in Congress to change that situation. Most political leaders today claim they support an “all of the above” energy strategy.  Yet solar and other renewable energy resources are currently restricted by the lack of access to master limited partnerships (MLPs). MLPs are business structures that are taxed as a partnership, but whose ownership interests are traded like corporate stock on a market. MLPs have the advantage of avoiding double taxation.  Projects done through MLPs… [more]

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The Politics of “Fracking”: Regulating Natural Gas Drilling Practices in Colorado and Texas

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: July 19, 2013 at 1:40 PM

Full Title: The Politics of “Fracking”: Regulating Natural Gas Drilling Practices in Colorado and Texas Author(s): Charles Davis Publisher(s): Colorado State University Publication Date: 2/2012 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description: This paper focuses on the politics of regulating natural gas fracking operations in Colorado and Texas. Between state differences in the economic importance of natural gas production, political traditions, environmental impacts of drilling activities, and local governmental responses to risk reduction, and entrepreneurial activities are discussed in relation to policymaking initiatives. In the concluding section, this article suggest that Colorado’s regulatory approach offers a greater degree of environmental protection than Texas. Key reforms adopted in… [more]

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Research and Policy Recommendations for Hydraulic Fracturing and Shale‐Gas Extraction

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 1:31 PM

Full Title: Research and Policy Recommendations for Hydraulic Fracturing and Shale‐Gas Extraction Author(s): Robert B. Jackson, Brooks Rainey Pearson, Stephen G. Osborn, Nathaniel R. Warner, Avner Vengosh Publisher(s): Duke University Publication Date: 1/2011 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description: Based on the results of Osborn and colleagues and the need for greater knowledge of the environmental effects of shale-gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing, this paper offers six research recommendations to improve public confidence in shale‐gas extraction. The first four research recommendations address the presence of methane and other gases in drinking water and follow directly from the results of Osborn and colleagues. The fifth and sixth… [more]

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Is Fracking a ‘Happy Solution’ to our Energy Needs?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 1:22 PM

Full Title: Is Fracing a “Happy Solution” to our Energy Needs? Author(s): Richard Vodra Publisher(s): Advisor Perspectives Publication Date: 1/2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description: Over the last few years, we have seen increasing enthusiasm – bordering on hype – over the idea that horizontal drilling plus hydraulic fracturing of shale rock to produce oil and gas, commonly referred to as “fracking,” is changing everything. The US is about to be the leading oil-producing nation again, says the International Energy Agency. We have 100 years of abundant gas supplies, says President Obama. In the recent election, thanks to these developments, the candidates were actually debating… [more]

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