Search Results for natural-gas
86 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

U.S. Approaching Energy Self-Sufficiency?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 8, 2012 at 8:51 AM

According to data collected and reported by Bloomberg News, the “U.S. is the closest it has been in almost 20 years to achieving energy self-sufficiency”. In the first 10 months of 2011, 81% of U.S. energy demand was met by domestic sources, up from a record low of 70% in 2005. If the 2011 numbers are accurate, this would be the highest proportion of U.S. energy demand met by domestic sources since 1992. This upward trend in energy self-sufficiency is due in large part to increased oil and natural gas development, and low natural gas prices. “Domestic oil output is… [more]

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Discussion

Oil and Gas Bills Advance to House

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 3, 2012 at 8:43 AM

Three House bills that would greatly expand U.S. oil and gas development – H.R. 3407, H.R. 3408, and H.R. 3410 – were approved by the Natural Resources Committee on February 1, 2012. H.R. 3407 would open up vast areas of Alaska’s coastal plain to oil leasing. H.R. 3408 would expand shale oil development in several Western states. Many Democrats opposed the bill, arguing that the environmental, social, and geologic risks of shale oil development are not yet well understood. The committee voted down a Democratic amendment that would have required the USGS to study oil shale development impacts on water… [more]

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Discussion

Natural Gas Estimates Greatly Reduced

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 1, 2012 at 8:03 AM

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has lowered its estimates of U.S. natural gas resources. The EIA’s 2012 estimate for total U.S. natural gas is 482 trillion cubic feet, down more than 40% from its 2011 estimate of 827 tcf. [New York Times] Because of increased gas production throughout the U.S., EIA had more data available in making its 2012 estimates. For example, with additional data from increased production throughout the Marcellus shale – a geological formation stretching beneath West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio and New York – EIA adjusted its estimates for the Marcellus to 141 tcf, down nearly 66% from… [more]

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Balancing the Benefits and Costs of Natural Gas

Author(s): Melanie A. Kenderdine
Principal
Energy Futures Initiative
Date: January 26, 2012 at 8:19 AM

Modeling results in the MIT Future of Natural Gas Study released in June of last year suggested that the US could make major progress in the next two decades towards achieving a 50% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 – a real reduction, no offsets or other creative and questionable mechanisms –largely through two actions: reduced energy consumption, and switching from coal to natural gas in power generation. The study also concluded that simply by utilizing surplus Natural Gas Combined Cycle capacity from existing units in lieu of coal generation, the US could achieve a 20% reduction in CO2 emissions… [more]

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Discussion

Renewable Energy Finance

Author(s): Elias Hinckley
Partner
KL Gates
Date: January 25, 2012 at 10:08 AM

In the State of the Union President Obama renewed his commitment to the widespread adoption of renewable power as a critical piece of America’s energy and economic future.  In last year’s speech he included a proposal to have 80 percent of US electricity come from renewables by 2035. Even making incremental steps towards these goals requires better access to financing for these renewable energy projects.  Energy projects, and particularly renewable energy projects, require a lot of money to build. There appear to be 3 key challenges for a renewable energy company to access capital in today’s market. (1) Low natural… [more]

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Discussion

The High Cost of Clean Energy Standards without Efficiency

Author(s): Marilyn Brown
Professor of Public Policy
Georgia Institute of Technology
Date: January 17, 2012 at 8:22 AM

In his 2011 State of the Union address, President Obama proposed a Clean Energy Standard (CES) requiring that 80 percent of the nation’s electricity come from clean energy resources by 2035. Over the past decade, Congress has debated renewable electricity standards, typically allowing energy efficiency to meet a portion of the target. For example, in 2009, an RES was included in the American Clean Energy Leadership Act of 2009, requiring 15% renewables by 2021, and 27% of this target could be met by energy efficiency. What happened to energy efficiency in the President’s proposal? A well-designed CES policy would enable… [more]

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Discussion

Natural Gas and Hydrofracking

Author(s): David J. Manning
Director, Stakeholder Relations/External Affairs
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Date: January 6, 2012 at 8:45 AM

Hydrofracking for natural gas in shale formations has generated a heated national debate, complicating and in some cases preventing efforts to extract the resource. Critics of hydrofracking cite the process’ uncertain environmental and geologic risks. Meanwhile, natural gas developers and policymakers have been working to identify and implement technical standards and best practices to overcome or reduce these risks to negligible levels. In my home state of New York, Governor Andrew Cuomo has said of hydrofracking: “Let’s get the facts. Let the science and the facts make the determination, not emotion and not politics.” I agree. State of the art… [more]

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ExxonMobil’s 2012 Outlook for Energy

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 21, 2011 at 8:35 AM

ExxonMobil recently released its 2012 Outlook for Energy: A View to 2040, a report forecasting energy trends out for the next several decades. Among the projections highlighted in ExxonMobil’s announcement: “Global energy demand is expected to rise by about 30 percent from 2010 to 2040, [but] demand growth would be approximately four times that amount without projected gains in efficiency.” “ExxonMobil sees advanced hybrid vehicles accounting for 50 percent of the cars people will drive in 2040, compared to about 1 percent today. This, plus improved fuel economy in conventional vehicles, will cause demand for energy for personal vehicles to… [more]

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Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 20, 2011 at 5:24 PM

Note: Synopsis drawn from the report. Synopsis intended solely for the purpose of generating discussion. Blueprint for a Secure Energy Future by the Obama Administration Demand for oil in countries like China and India is growing, and the price of oil will continue to rise with it. We need to make America more secure and control our energy future by harnessing all of the resources that we have available and embracing a diverse energy portfolio. Beyond our efforts to reduce our dependence on oil, we must focus on expanding cleaner sources of electricity, including renewables like wind and solar, as… [more]

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The Future of Natural Gas: An Interdisciplinary MIT Study

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 5:20 PM

Note: Synopsis drawn from report’s executive summary. Synopsis intended solely for purposes of generating discussion. The Future of Natural Gas: An Interdisciplinary MIT Study By the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Energy Initiative Natural gas has moved to the center of the current debate on energy, security and climate. This study examines the role of natural gas in a carbon-constrained world, with a time horizon out to mid-century. The overarching conclusions are that: Abundant global natural gas resources imply greatly expanded natural gas use, with especially large growth in electricity generation. Natural gas will assume an increasing share of the U.S.… [more]

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