Search Results for oil
103 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

The New Geopolitics of Petroleum and Natural Gas: How Will the Tight Oil Boom Affect the Prospects for Arctic and Ultra-Deepwater Oil Development?

Author(s): David Rosner
Associate Director for Energy Security
Bipartisan Policy Center
Date: April 17, 2014 at 9:00 AM

OurEnergyPolicy.org has partnered with the Bipartisan Policy Center for Navigating the Oil Frontier: The Implications of the Tight Oil Boom on Arctic and Ultra-Deepwater Oil Development, to be held Monday April 21st at the Washington Court Hotel. This discussion is a digital extension of that event. With the onset of the U.S. tight oil boom, the growth of Canadian oil sands production, and the prospects for expanded Mexican oil production, expectations about future oil supply have shifted from traditional OPEC oil producers to countries whose oil production had previously been declining.  The reduction of Arctic ice and development of deep-water… [more]

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Discussion

Is The Strategic Petroleum Reserve A Solution To The Crisis in Ukraine?

Author(s): Vikram Rao
Executive Director
Research Triangle Energy Consortium
Date: April 9, 2014 at 9:36 AM

George Soros was recently quoted as suggesting that the US use the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) as a deterrent to Russian aggression in Ukraine.  I thought we could examine the validity of that premise. The SPR, an emergency supply of oil maintained by the United States, is currently near capacity at about 700 million barrels. In our new world driven by shale oil,  a supply disruption would require tapping SPR help for a much shorter period than was envisioned when the SPR’s capacity was designed. Oil represents more than half of all Russian budget revenues and 30% of Russia’s GDP.… [more]

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Discussion

Metrics for Comparing Alternative Liquid Fuels

Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: February 20, 2014 at 7:04 AM

It is clear that the Age of Oil is winding down. Worldwide, the rate of discovery of new oil reserves peaked in the 1960s and in the US our peak rate of oil discovery occurred in the early 1930s. In recent years the world has used about three barrels of oil for every barrel of new oil reserves discovered. Thus we are living largely on past oil discoveries. There is still a lot of oil in the world, and we will still be using a lot of oil decades from now. But it will be increasingly expensive both economically and… [more]

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Discussion

Energy from the Earth: Practical geoscience to inform energy legislation

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 11, 2014 at 11:24 AM

Full Title: Energy from the Earth: Practical geoscience to inform energy legislation Author(s): Gene Whitney, Scott Tinker, Brenda Pierce Publisher(s): American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Association of Petroleum Geologists, American Geophysical Union, American Geosciences Institute, Association of American State Geologists, Geological Society of America, National Science Foundation—Directorate for Geosciences, U.S. Geological Survey Publication Date: 11/2013 Presentations from the briefing, which gave an overview of the series and US energy needs and supply: Gene Whitney ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Scott Tinker ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Brenda Pierce ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt):  Energy production and consumption supports modern life in the United States, and is integral to the economy, individual communities, and… [more]

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Discussion

Simplifying the Energy Tax Code

Author(s): Ryan Abraham
Senior Tax Counsel
United States Senate Committee on Finance
Date: February 3, 2014 at 8:19 AM

As part of his efforts to comprehensively reform the tax code, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-MT) released a staff discussion draft on December 18, 2013 that proposed a dramatically simpler set of energy tax incentives that are technology-neutral, more predictable, and promote cleaner energy that is made in the United States. Policymakers have included tax breaks for energy in the tax code for nearly one hundred years. These incentives were created with good intentions to create jobs, promote energy security, and help reduce air pollution and environmental damage. But over the years, the number of provisions has ballooned… [more]

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What is the Economic Impact of the Domestic Oil and Natural Gas Boom?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: January 14, 2014 at 12:50 PM

The boom in oil and gas production in the United States has largely been heralded as a strong economic stimulus for the economy. For example, in an August 2013 interview, McKinsey partner Scott Nyquist outlined huge economic returns through increases in capital investment and jobs in the manufacturing sector. “This is an exciting game changer for the US economy,” said Nyquist. “It can create jobs through investment in the energy sector itself and through the ripple effects in other parts of the economy. It will increase the overall GDP of the country, which will increase the overall wealth and well-being… [more]

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Discussion

Should the Crude Oil Export Ban Be Lifted?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 19, 2013 at 10:30 AM

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz recently acknowledged that it may be time to lift the ban on exporting crude oil, a comment that elicited a flurry of support and opposition toward the idea and highlighted the need for a thorough debate on the issue. The ban was enacted in 1975, along with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, as an energy supply security measure in response to the Arab oil embargoes. Since that time, the US energy landscape has changed and many are calling for a review of potentially outdated policies. “Those restrictions on exports were borne, as was the Department of Energy… [more]

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Discussion

Should U.S. Energy Policy Aim For “Stability” Or “Leverage” In Global Energy Markets?

Author(s): Robert Grant
Director of International Public Policy and Advocacy
Global Innovation Policy Center, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Date: November 20, 2013 at 7:10 AM

The United States is set to become the world’s number one producer of oil and gas combined. But since the oil crises of the 1970s, U.S. energy policy has been based, either implicitly or explicitly, on the assumption of scarcity of U.S. resources. This has resulted in strong support for open and transparent global energy markets, which are expected to reduce volatile (and high) prices for U.S. customers and enable U.S. companies to access foreign energy supplies. What policy makers now have to reckon with is what the re-discovery of a bounty of domestic supplies (of oil and gas) means for U.S. energy policy,… [more]

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Should The Renewable Fuel Standard Change With Fuel Demand?

Author(s): Matthew Carr
Managing Director, Industrial & Environmental Section
Biotechnology Industry Organization
Date: October 30, 2013 at 7:00 AM

A recent editorial in the Wall Street Journal, co-signed by Rep. Patrick Meehan (R-Pa.), argues that growing renewable fuel obligations under the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) have come into direct conflict with declining U.S. demand for transportation fuel.  The editorial asserts that current fuel distribution infrastructure and automobile engine guidelines limit the amount of ethanol that can be blended into gasoline to 10 percent, creating a “blend wall” beyond which further blending of ethanol becomes economically unreasonable. Meanwhile, in response to high fuel prices, consumers have radically curbed their driving habits and sought out new cars that meet more… [more]

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Discussion

Fuel Choice and Energy Security

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 22, 2013 at 7:05 AM

A report, “Fuel Choice for American Prosperity,” recently published by the United States Energy Security Council (USESC), a group within the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security (IAGS), identifies challenges facing the United States’ pursuit of energy security. Despite oil imports expected to fall to their lowest level since 1987 (EIA), the total amount of money the U.S. spends on oil imports has increased. If energy security is defined as “reliable supply at an affordable price,” as the report’s authors define, the U.S. has improved the former, but failed to impact global oil prices, which have risen more than… [more]

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