Search Results for oil-supply
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Discussion

Arctic Potential: Realizing the Promise of U.S. Arctic Oil and Gas Resources

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 17, 2015 at 10:58 AM

Full Title: Arctic Potential: Realizing the Promise of U.S. Arctic Oil and Gas Resources Author(s): National Petroleum Council Publisher(s): National Petroleum Council Publication Date: 03/2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): The Arctic is home to distinct indigenous peoples and provides habitat for large numbers of birds, mammals, and fishes. While some areas of the Arctic, such as the central North Slope of Alaska around Prudhoe Bay, have seen decades of economic activity, much of the region remains largely unaffected by human presence. Today, there is increasing interest in the Arctic for tourist potential, and reductions in summer ice provide an increasing opportunity for marine traffic. At the same time,… [more]

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Discussion

Energy Security: Meeting the Growing Challenge of National Oil Companies

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 2, 2015 at 11:52 AM

Full Title: Energy Security: Meeting the Growing Challenge of National Oil Companies Author(s): Amy Myers Jaffe and Matthew Chen Publisher(s): The Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations Publication Date: 2007 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): This paper discusses the challenges posed by national oil companies (NOCs) in states such as Venezuela, Russia and China presents the United States with a number of dilemmas. The authors argue that while the rise of NOCs from consuming and producing countries does not constitute an immediate threat to US national security, the growing economic power and strategic influence of NOCs on global energy… [more]

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IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 22, 2015 at 3:23 PM

Full Title: IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Author(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2012 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): The IEA Response to an Oil Supply Disruption: In the event of an actual or potentially severe oil supply disruption, the IEA Directorate of Energy Markets and Security assesses the market impact and the potential need for an IEA co-ordinated response. This market assessment includes an estimate of the additional production oil producers can bring to the market quickly, based on consultation with producer governments. Based on this assessment, the IEA Executive Director… [more]

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Discussion

Another Oil-Related Recession?

Author(s): Herschel Specter
President
Micro-Utilities, Inc.
Date: February 26, 2013 at 7:00 AM

Are the United States and other countries facing a looming threat of another oil-related recession? Prior to the economic crash in 2008 the price of oil steadily increased. As the world margin between supply and world demand approached zero, oil prices rose. When this margin went to zero, oil prices hit $147/barrel and the recession began. Unlike many politically initiated oil recessions of the past, a major recession trigger in 2008 was a “physically” initiated event — the disappearance of the margin between world supply and demand. Physically initiated oil recessions do not have the post-peak, national, debt-free “stimulus package”… [more]

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The End of Cheap Oil and How It Is Changing Our World

Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: February 7, 2013 at 12:40 PM

The last century can rightly be called the Age of (Inexpensive or ‘Cheap’) Oil as world oil consumption grew from about 20 million tons per year in 1900 to just under 400 million tons per year in 2005. Since 2005, however, world oil consumption has been nearly constant despite high demand and record high oil prices, which indicates that we simply cannot produce oil any faster. And since oil is not renewable, eventually the production (and therefore the consumption) of oil must decline. Declining oil production will be an extremely painful reality for the U.S. because not only does the… [more]

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