Search Results for power-sector
43 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

American Perspectives on Energy Efficiency

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 9, 2014 at 1:38 PM

On April 30th, OurEnergyPolicy.org and The University of Texas at Austin co-hosted “American Perspectives on Energy Efficiency,” a panel discussion about energy efficiency at The National Press Club. The panel of thought-leaders provided insight into energy efficiency policy issues and explored the results of two recent sister surveys that reveal Americans’ and energy professionals’ perspectives on energy efficiency. Please see below for an abridged version of the transcript and a full video recording of the event. You can view or download the full transcript here. Opening remarks: Bill Squadron, President, OurEnergyPolicy.org Presentation of survey results: Sheril Kirshenbaum, Director of The… [more]

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Discussion

Can Natural Gas and Renewables Be Synergistic, Not Competitive?

Author(s): Dawn Santoianni
Lead Communications Consultant
Duke Energy
Date: April 2, 2014 at 7:05 AM

The role of natural gas in a clean energy future has been widely debated due to concerns over life-cycle carbon emissions and perceptions that relying on natural gas as a “bridge fuel” is short-sighted and reduces investment in clean energy. A study published in the journal Science concluded methane leaks from the production and piping of natural gas were underestimated and could be large enough to undermine the carbon reduction benefits compared to coal. Recent utility developments have highlighted the competition between renewables and natural gas: Faced with a capacity shortage as a result of the retirement of the 2,200… [more]

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Discussion

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Various Electric Reliability Improvement Projects from the End Users’ Perspective

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: January 28, 2014 at 12:30 PM

Full Title:  Cost-Benefit Analysis of Various Electric Reliability Improvement Projects from the End Users’ Perspective Author(s): N/A Publisher(s): National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners Publication Date: 11/2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt):  This report provides two of the three deliverables for the Cost Benefit Analysis of Various Electric Reliability Improvement Projects from the End Users’ Perspective. One of the two deliverables included in this report is a Summary Analysis of the cost to customers (residential, commercial, and industrial) of extended outages provided by day of the week, each 4 day combination of weekday and weekends, and a week. The other deliverable is a section of… [more]

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Discussion

Advancing Energy Innovation in the Electric Power Sector

Author(s): Jan Brinch
Principal
Brinch Consulting
Date: November 27, 2013 at 9:05 AM

Changes in the electric power industry are well underway in many states across the U.S. As a result of numerous drivers – including the need to address climate change, natural gas prices, retiring coal plants, the pace of grid modernization – many electric utilities are changing the way they interact with their customers and considering how to adapt their business and planning models. Third party vendors are marketing new energy services and regulators, legislators, and consumer advocates are evaluating the existing policy landscape to consider ways to facilitate innovative technologies and services. The Keystone Center, with support from the National… [more]

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Discussion

Assessing the Impacts of EPA’s New Coal Power Plant Rules

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: September 24, 2013 at 1:15 AM

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released draft rules on September 20th, to limit carbon emissions from new coal power plants. The proposed rules are part of President Obama’s broader Climate Action Plan aimed at combating climate change and improving public health, according to the EPA. Under the rules, new coal-fired power plants would be limited to 1,100 pounds of CO2 per megawatt-hour, or could opt to meet stricter average emissions limits that grant additional operational flexibility. The rules also would require new plants to implement partial carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. Critics of the proposed rules argue that… [more]

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Discussion

How Much (And What Kind) of Energy Is Enough?



Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: April 22, 2013 at 4:05 PM

High energy use (power consumption) increases wealth, health and education levels. Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, most energy has come from fossil fuels: coal, oil and natural gas. Whatever the eventual lifetimes of these fossil energy resources, they are not renewable. Sooner or later, fossil energy will not be available to underpin our prosperity. Thus non-renewable energy is not a long-term option. We must have renewable energy if we are to maintain high living standards among advanced economies, and if more people in developing nations are to access enough energy to develop their human potential. But how much… [more]

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Discussion

Japan Revives Nuclear. Will We?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 4, 2012 at 7:44 AM

The Japanese government, which had announced a gradual phase-out of nuclear power by 2040, reversed that position and will instead develop an energy policy “with flexibility, based on tireless verification and re-examination.” The country was faced with the difficulty of replacing the 30% of electricity it gets from nuclear energy, and altering an existing strategy that would have seen that number rise to 50%. The reduction in nuclear energy usage would have come through greater reliance on renewable energy, conservation, and the use of fossil fuels, according to the original plan. Although nuclear will remain in the mix, no new… [more]

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Discussion

Water-Energy Nexus Debate Heats Up

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: August 20, 2012 at 10:44 AM

As drought continues to affect much of the U.S., many observers are thinking critically about the water-energy nexus. A New York Times article points out the myriad ways in which water shortages can threaten energy, from low river levels reducing hydropower output, to cities banning the use of municipal water for hydraulic fracturing. Although we have yet to see water access limit our ability to produce energy, it could lead to higher energy prices, particularly for natural gas, which will increasingly require water recycling and freshwater transport from non-local sources. Biofuels will also increase in price, if crops fail and… [more]

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Discussion

Do We Need a National Energy Policy?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 11, 2012 at 7:38 AM

Over the past several years individuals and organizations across the political spectrum have called for a comprehensive national energy policy. For example, the CEO of American Electric Power (AEP) recently called for a comprehensive, multi-decade policy, citing the power sector’s desire for regulatory certainty. “One of the biggest challenges [for AEP], certainly from a regulatory perspective,” he said, “[is that] regulations tend to change based upon what administration is in place. Really we do need an element of consistency there.” Robert Rapier, author of the R-Squared column at Consumer Energy Report, also supports the need for more stable energy policies.… [more]

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Discussion

Perspectives on the Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 24, 2012 at 7:13 AM

Last week the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, chaired by Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM), held a hearing on the Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012 (CESA). Witnesses offered a variety of perspectives on the bill. As discussed during the hearing, the EIA’s Analysis of the Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012 projects an increase in renewable generation, a decrease in carbon emissions, and a hike in electric rates compared to a business-as-usual scenario. Dr. Karen Palmer of Resources for the Future supported many of the EIA’s findings, but added that the small utility exemption — which exempts energy retailers… [more]

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