Search Results for power-sector
43 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Changes at the NRC?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 23, 2012 at 7:44 AM

Steve Jaczko, Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), announced his resignation this week amidst unflattering reports of his leadership and congressional hearings. Jaczko spent three years as Chairman and more than 7 years on the Commission. He will step down after a successor is confirmed, or after June of 2013, when his term would have ended. His tenure was marked by efforts to address longstanding safety concerns at nuclear reactors across the U.S., although these efforts were viewed with skepticism by those in the industry, according to the New York Times. Jaczko was criticized for ending the government’s consideration… [more]

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The End of Coal?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 17, 2012 at 7:22 AM

Bloomberg Government has published The Twilight of Coal Power?, an assessment of how EPA’s new greenhouse gas rules might affect coal-fired power plants. The report concludes that although coal will remain in the energy mix for decades due to existing plants, the EPA’s new rule will effectively ban new coal plants. The new rules require that fossil plants not exceed 1,000 lbs. of CO2/MWh. Scott Segal, executive director of the Electric Reliability Coordinating Council, which represents utility interests, warns that EPA’s rule will disrupt utility hedging by eliminating coal from the fuel mix and “depriving the market of its flexibility.”… [more]

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EIA: CES would Raise Electric Rates, Reduce Emissions

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 14, 2012 at 7:26 AM

In response to a request from the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has released its Analysis of Impacts of the Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012. Committee chairman Jeff Bingaman (D-NM), introduced the Act, which aims to increase low-carbon power generation in the U.S. by more than 80% by 2035 utilizing a market-based system of tradable energy credits. Beginning in 2015, utilities would be required to sell an increasing percentage of energy from clean energy sources. Utilities could generate electricity from clean sources to meet the Act’s requirements, or could purchase clean energy… [more]

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AEP CEO Urges Comprehensive U.S. Energy Policy

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 1, 2012 at 7:40 AM

In an April 26th speech to business leaders at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Nick Akins, President and CEO of American Electric Power, urged the U.S. to develop a comprehensive energy policy. Akins explained that a recent “perfect storm of circumstances” – including EPA regulations, diminished reliance on nuclear power, and low natural gas prices – are making natural gas the de facto favored fuel for power generation. This is a concern for Akins, who points out that natural gas prices have been volatile historically, and that relying on a single fuel source for power generation is risky. [Columbia Dispatch]… [more]

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Enthusiasm and Concern over Natural Gas Exports

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 26, 2012 at 7:27 AM

As American natural gas production continues to increase, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a greater number of applications from companies interested in exporting liquefied natural gas (LNG). At the same time, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is seeing more applications from companies seeking to build new LNG export terminals and liquefaction facilities. Currently, the U.S. only exports LNG internationally by exporting natural gas imported from other countries, a practice that increased in 2011. So far, nearly all applications to export U.S. LNG to Free Trade Agreement (FTA) countries – eighteen countries including Australia, Canada, Chile, Israel,… [more]

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Cheap Natural Gas & U.S. Power Supply

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 18, 2012 at 7:16 AM

Last week the EIA reported that natural gas-fired power generation will increase by as much as 17% in 2012, while coal is expected to decrease 10%. This shift away from coal and toward natural gas is largely tied to gas’ low price, as well as projections of the impacts of increasingly strict federal regulation on power plants. In March, natural gas spot prices averaged $2.18MMBtu, their lowest level since 1999. Then on April 11th, the NYMEX May gas futures contract settled at a 10-year low of $1.984/MMBtu [EIA]. Despite low gas prices, some utilities express hesitancy about over-committing to gas-generated… [more]

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Will Fusion Realize Its Potential?

Author(s): Michael S. Lubell
Professor of Physics
City College of the City University of New York
Date: April 2, 2012 at 6:16 AM

For decades many have considered nuclear fusion to be the brass ring of energy technologies, believing that – were it to be successful and commercially viable – it would offer sustained electricity production with no CO2, particulate pollution, or radioactive waste. Research into safely and consistently harnessing fusion’s potential for civil use has been ongoing since the mid-Twentieth Century. Yet to date no viable commercial applications have been developed. Two prominent fusion research efforts – ITER and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) – are facing potential problems. ITER may be at risk of diminished U.S. funding due to tightening Congressional… [more]

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Impact of EPA’s Proposed Greenhouse Gas Rules

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 29, 2012 at 7:56 AM

On March 27, 2012 the Environmental Protection Agency, under the authority of the Clean Air Act, released proposed greenhouse gas standards for newly constructed power plants. The rules would require that “new fossil‐fuel‐fired power plants meet an output‐based standard of 1,000 pounds of CO2 per megawatt‐hour (lb CO2/MWh gross).” Combined-cycle natural gas plants should be able to meet this requirement, and coal- or petroleum coke-fired plants would be able to with emerging technologies such as carbon capture and storage. The proposed rules elicited varied response from advocacy groups, many of which were highlighted in this Los Angeles Times article. Environmental… [more]

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High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon future

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 28, 2012 at 2:51 PM

Full Title:  High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon future Author(s): Nelson J, Johnston J, Mileva A, Fripp M, Hoffman I, Petros-Good A, Blanco C, Kammen DM Publisher(s): Energy Policy Publication Date: 1/2012 Language: English Length: 14 pages, PDF Full Text: –>DOWNLOAD FILE<– Description (excerpt): Decarbonizing electricity production is central to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Exploiting intermittent renewable energy resources demands power system planning models with high temporal and spatial resolution. We use a mixed-integer linear programming model – SWITCH – to analyze least- cost generation, storage, and transmission capacity expansion for western North… [more]

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Is Carbon Capture A Viable Option?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 27, 2012 at 7:19 AM

In a study of U.S. carbon capture and storage (CCS) potential published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology found “that the United States can store enough CO2 to stabilize emissions at their current rate for over a hundred years. This result suggests that with a favorable political and economic framework, carbon capture and storage can be a viable climate change mitigation option in this country for the next century.” The video below explains their findings:  

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