Search Results for renewables
66 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Hydropower – Time Tested and Ready for the New Energy Era

Author(s): Scott Corwin
Executive Director
Northwest Public Power Association
Date: April 29, 2019 at 10:33 AM

During an era of unprecedented change in the energy industry, hydropower offers a renewable and emission-free power source that boasts some unique attributes. Not only does hydropower provide reliable base-load generation, but it also has a high level of flexibility that enables storage and ramping capability. These qualities match well with the increasing need to balance intermittent renewable generation sources, such as wind and solar. At just seven percent of total electricity generation in the U.S., hydropower already displaces about 200 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions that would otherwise come from thermal generation. It is efficient in its… [more]

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Discussion

The Problem with Renewable Energy Subsidies

Author(s): Cutter González
Energy Project Campaign Manager, Policy Analyst
Texas Public Policy Foundation
Date: December 3, 2018 at 11:37 AM

The Production Tax Credit (PTC), a federal subsidy for renewable energy, is a $24-per-megawatt-hour credit based on energy production rather than demand. That means those who produce renewable energy can receive the credit regardless of whether or not that electricity is actually needed. The incentive is so immense that at peak hours of output wind producers can actually pay retail electric providers, the companies that deliver the energy to homes and businesses, to take their product. This “negative pricing” scheme caused by the PTC and other subsidies is having serious consequences.The instability it causes can push out the energy producers that… [more]

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Discussion

A Bold Step Forward for Solar

Author(s): Zadie Oleksiw
Communications Director
Vote Solar
Date: October 29, 2018 at 11:09 AM

In May, the California Energy Commission unanimously approved the nation’s first commitment to putting solar on qualifying new home construction starting in 2020 – a move that’ll be good for our cost-of-living and our climate alike. Building solar on new homes is consistent with California’s zero net energy goals for new buildings, and it’s a great way of getting rooftop solar built cheaply for customers. When solar PV is installed at the time of construction, you get economies of scale and save big on non-hardware costs like customer acquisition, permitting and financing. Assuming modules are 40 cents/W and the other… [more]

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Debate Continues Over Carbon Neutrality of Biomass

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 30, 2018 at 9:25 AM

Last Monday, Scott Pruitt announced that the Environmental Protection Agency will now consider the burning of biomass for energy to be carbon neutral. The agency memo points out that the use of biomass for energy can bolster domestic energy production, reduce wildfire risk, and help ensure that forests continue to remove carbon from the atmosphere. The memo further states that “Managed forests improve air and water quality while creating valuable jobs and thousands of products that improve our daily lives.” Despite the ruling, using biomass for energy remains a contentious issue. Scientists and various non-governmental organizations have raised concerns that… [more]

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Discussion

Strategic Planning to Avert a Global Warming Catastrophe

Author(s): Henry M. Goldberg
Consultant
Independent
Date: December 4, 2017 at 10:00 AM

The United States and world are facing a crisis of enormous magnitude if the global warming problem is not addressed properly.  Every country in the world, except the current U.S. administration, supports the Paris climate agreement goal limiting the rise in global average surface temperature to 2°C (3.6°F).  The consequences of failure could be a catastrophic future: Flooding from rising sea levels, more severe hurricanes/heat waves/wildfires, crop failures and droughts, and greater stress on an already aging infrastructure. Climate scientists generally agree carbon emissions should be reduced to near zero by mid-century to avert catastrophic climate change. But the voluntary… [more]

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Discussion

Solar Plus Energy Storage: Comparing System Options

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: June 30, 2017 at 10:40 AM

Full Title: Solar Plus Energy Storage: Comparing System Options Author(s): Chip Palombini Publisher(s): Dynapower Publication Date: 06/2017 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): North America currently has over 20 GW of installed utility-scale PV generation. With 2016 seeing the largest amount of PV installed to date with over 14 GW brought online. The majority of this installed utility-scale PV base could expand production hours and increase revenues with the addition of energy storage. Here we will examine the coupling of energy storage with PV by comparing three principle methods: AC-coupled, DC-coupled, and hybrid solar-plus-storage inverters. We will also consider all possible… [more]

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Discussion

Next Generation Utility: Finding a Path through the Haze

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 20, 2016 at 8:37 PM

Full Title: Next Generation Utility: Finding a Path through the Haze Author(s): PA Consulting Publication Date: 2016 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Around the world, the electric utilities industry is talking about low carbon, renewables, commodity prices, distributed energy resources (DERs), smart grid, customer engagement, shareholder value, workforce transformation and the impact all or some combination of these factors are likely to have on the traditional business models for energy suppliers and network operators. The influence these forces are having on the industry clearly depends on geography, as well as the overall policy and regulatory environment. However, there are more similarities than… [more]

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Discussion

The Limits of Wind Power

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 13, 2016 at 11:51 PM

Full Title: The Limits of Wind Power Author(s): William Korchinski Publisher(s): Adam Smith Institute Publication Date: February 2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Environmentalists advocate wind power as one of the main alternatives to fossil fuels, claiming that it is both cost effective and low in carbon emissions. This study seeks to evaluate these claims. Existing estimates of the life-cycle emissions from wind turbines range from 5 to 100 grams of CO2 equivalent per kilowatt hour of electricity produced. This very wide range is explained by differences in what was included in each analysis, and the proportion of electricity… [more]

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Coordinating State and Federal Energy Policy in Support of Nuclear

Author(s): Dr. Andrew C. Kadak
President
Kadak Associates, Inc.
Date: November 16, 2015 at 12:00 PM

There is an inconvenient and uncomfortable truth that nuclear energy is a significant non-CO2 source of electrical power in the U.S. Despite the dramatic expansion of solar and wind, these alternative forms of energy only provide 15% of non-CO2 emitting power nationwide. Nuclear energy on the other hand, provides 63% of all CO2-free sources. Often when a utility decides to shut down a nuclear plant it is replaced by natural gas. But replacing nuclear with “clean” natural gas only adds to the global CO2 load. In fact, each 1,000 megawatts of nuclear power replaced by natural gas adds 3.6 million… [more]

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Discussion

The Case for Nuclear Central Station Power

Author(s): David Hammer
J.C. Ward Jr. Professor of Nuclear Energy Engineering
Cornell University
Date: September 9, 2015 at 9:30 AM

 “Sustainable future” advocates seem to believe that solar, wind and hydro-electricity will eventually make up close to 100% of our energy generation, but there are benefits to having “central station” power plants in addition to distributed power generation. If the goal is to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while assuring the health of our economy, the most viable way of generating central station power at present is nuclear fission. Central station power complements distributive power generation in two important ways.  Central station power plants are better able produce power on a small area relatively close to where the energy will… [more]

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