Search Results for shale-gas
12 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

Drilling Deeper: A Reality Check on U.S. Government Forecasts for a Lasting Tight Oil and Shale Gas Boom

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 6, 2016 at 3:10 PM

Full Title: Drilling Deeper: A Reality Check on U.S. Government Forecasts for a Lasting Tight Oil and Shale Gas Boom Author(s): J. David Hughes Publisher(s): Postcarbon Institute Publication Date: Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Drilling Deeper reviews the twelve shale plays that account for 82% of the tight oil production and 88% of the shale gas production in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA) reference case forecasts through 2040. It utilizes all available production data for the plays analyzed, and assesses historical production, well- and field-decline rates, available drilling locations, and well-quality trends for each play,… [more]

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The ‘Shale Gas Revolution’: Developments and Changes

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 24, 2016 at 2:18 PM

Full Title: Author(s): Publisher(s): Publication Date: Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): In September 2010, Chatham House published a report by this author entitled The ‘Shale Gas Revolution’: Hype and Reality. The report, after describing the ‘shale gas revolution’ in the United States, then considered two key questions: could the revolution continue there and could it be replicated elsewhere? The answers to both questions were ambivalent. The resulting uncertainty was beginning to inhibit investment in conventional and unconventional gas. Thus the report argued that in five to ten years’ time, given that gas demand would continue to grow, there could… [more]

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The energy-water nexus: potential groundwater-quality degradation associated with production of shale gas

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 22, 2015 at 3:09 PM

Full Title: The energy-water nexus: potential groundwater-quality degradation associated with production of shale gas Author(s): Y.K. Kharaka, J.J. Thordsen, C.H. Conaway, & R.B. Thomas Publisher(s): U.S. Geological Survey and Procedia Earth and Planetary Science Publication Date: 2013 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Oil and natural gas have been the main sources of primary energy in the USA, providing 63% of the total energy consumption in 2011. Petroleum production, drilling operations, and improperly sealed abandoned wells have caused significant local groundwater contamination in many states, including at the USGS OSPER sites in Oklahoma. The potential for groundwater contamination is higher when… [more]

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New Energy, New Geopolitics Balancing Stability and Leverage

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: April 16, 2015 at 3:05 PM

Full Title: New Energy, New Geopolitics Balancing Stability and Leverage Author(s): Sarah O. Ladislaw, Maren Leed, & Molly A. Walton Publisher(s): CSIS Publication Date: 04/2014 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): In the last ten years, U.S. shale gas and tight oil production has skyrocketed. Between 2005 and 2014, U.S. production of crude oil and natural gas has risen by nearly 65 and 34 per- cent, respectively, due to tight oil and shale gas development. The shale gas supplies from Pennsylvania alone equal the entire natural gas export capacity of Qatar, the world’s second largest natural gas exporter in 2012. And… [more]

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Can Shale Gas Limit Air Pollution?

Author(s): Richard Muller
Professor of Physics
University of Califoria at Berkeley
Date: May 15, 2014 at 7:15 AM

Some oppose shale gas because it is a fossil fuel, a source of carbon dioxide. Some are concerned by accounts of the fresh water it needs, by flaming faucets, by leaked “fugitive methane”, by pollution of the ground with fracking fluid and by damaging earthquakes. Although I believe that global warming is real, caused by humans, and a threat to our future, these concerns about shale gas are either largely false or can be addressed by appropriate regulation such as the controversial but ultimately positive developments in Illinois. Shale gas can not only reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but also reduce a deadly pollution known… [more]

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In Pennsylvania, Shale Boom Helps Fund Switch to Natural Gas Vehicles

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 21, 2013 at 8:55 AM

Pennsylvania’s Act 13 of 2012 created a three-year Natural Gas Energy Development Program that will allocate $20 million in grant funds to purchase or convert vehicles to natural gas.  The goal of Act 13 is “to help the state’s ongoing effort to move towards energy independence.” Last week, Pennsylvania’s Department of Environmental Protection issued the first $6.7 million of the competitive grant funds to 18 organizations across the state. The grant money comes from Pennsylvania’s drilling impact fee, which has raised $200 million from the gas industry flourishing in the Marcellus Shale. The grants are capped at 50 percent of… [more]

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Will the Bonanza of Cheap Natural Gas Postpone the Transition to a Clean Energy Future?

Author(s): Marilyn Brown
Professor of Public Policy
Georgia Institute of Technology
Date: March 27, 2013 at 6:10 PM

Thanks to breakthroughs in seismic imaging, horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, the US in 2012 reduced its reliance on much dirtier coal by shifting to gas-fired power plants. This trend is expected to continue, spurred by low gas prices and increased regulation on coal. The move to shale gas is being heralded as a key to economic prosperity and a clean energy future. But there are other options for displacing baseload electricity from retired coal plants, the principals being nuclear, renewables and energy efficiency. Will the gas bonanza enable or postpone the transition to these cleaner options? While natural gas… [more]

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Is Illinois Set to Take the Lead on Fracking Regulation?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 22, 2013 at 1:15 PM

A bill, recently introduced by Illinois State Representatives John Bradley and David Reis, to regulate hydraulic fracturing in the state is attracting support from both industry and environmental groups. The bill, House Bill 2615, introduced on February 21st, 2013, would impose new requirements on the oil and gas industry, such as: Public disclosure of all fracking chemicals before fracking begins Presumed liability of the oil and gas drillers for any environmental contamination near fracking sites, until proven otherwise Restrictions on venting and flaring of natural gas The bill’s supporters believe that it outlines an effective compromise that could open up… [more]

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Best Practices for Shale Development, Fracking

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: May 7, 2012 at 7:52 AM

Three recent efforts – two private, and one public – could shape the future of U.S. shale gas and oil development. The Marcellus Shale Coalition (MSC), an industry group, released Recommended Practices: Site Planning, Development and Restoration, offering general guidance for natural gas professionals developing or restoring shale plays in the Marcellus. Days later, the Appalachian Shale Responsible Producers Group (ASRPG), led by Andarko Energy, released their Recommended Standards and Practices, which again provides general guidance to well operators and shale play developers. Ohio Governor John Kasich has pushed legislation to the state’s legislature that the his office hopes will… [more]

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Discussion

U.S. Approaching Energy Self-Sufficiency?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: February 8, 2012 at 8:51 AM

According to data collected and reported by Bloomberg News, the “U.S. is the closest it has been in almost 20 years to achieving energy self-sufficiency”. In the first 10 months of 2011, 81% of U.S. energy demand was met by domestic sources, up from a record low of 70% in 2005. If the 2011 numbers are accurate, this would be the highest proportion of U.S. energy demand met by domestic sources since 1992. This upward trend in energy self-sufficiency is due in large part to increased oil and natural gas development, and low natural gas prices. “Domestic oil output is… [more]

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