Search Results for solar
39 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

The Case for Nuclear Central Station Power

Author(s): David Hammer
J.C. Ward Jr. Professor of Nuclear Energy Engineering
Cornell University
Date: September 9, 2015 at 9:30 AM

 “Sustainable future” advocates seem to believe that solar, wind and hydro-electricity will eventually make up close to 100% of our energy generation, but there are benefits to having “central station” power plants in addition to distributed power generation. If the goal is to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while assuring the health of our economy, the most viable way of generating central station power at present is nuclear fission. Central station power complements distributive power generation in two important ways.  Central station power plants are better able produce power on a small area relatively close to where the energy will… [more]

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Discussion

Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Executive Summary)

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: August 31, 2015 at 3:13 PM

Full Title: Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Executive Summary) Author(s): Trieu Mai, Debra Sandor, Ryan Wiser, and Thomas Schneider1 Publisher(s): National Renewable Energy Study (NREL) Publication Date: 2012 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): The National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL) Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) is an initial investigation of the extent to which renewable energy supply can meet the electricity demands of the continental United States over the next several decades. This study explores the implications and challenges of very high renewable electricity generation levels—from 30% up to 90%, focusing on 80%, of all U.S. electricity generation—in 2050. At such… [more]

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Discussion

The Role of Innovation in Meeting the EPA’s Clean Power Plan

Author(s): Peter Kelly-Detwiler
Principal
NorthBridge Energy Partners, LLC
Date: May 12, 2015 at 8:00 AM

The EPA’s proposed Clean Power Plan, meant to reduce carbon by 30% by 2030, is expected to be accomplished through a combination of improving existing power plants, switching to cleaner generation, boosting renewables, and improving energy efficiency. It is more than likely that the global economy’s ability to innovate and drive economies of scale will significantly ease this transition, providing as yet unknown but superior alternatives. Consider this: the wind and solar industries barely existed five years ago. Today, costs of wind have fallen by 58% in the last five years, and the price of installed solar has plummeted by… [more]

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Discussion

Will State Policies Adjust to Attract Renewable Energy Investment?

Author(s): Todd Foley
Chief Strategy Officer and SVP for Policy
American Council On Renewable Energy (ACORE)
Date: March 31, 2015 at 7:00 AM

In lieu of consistent energy policy at the federal level, businesses and power providers are increasingly looking to state legislatures for the right signals to invest in energy. The result? States are stepping up, leading to an increase in renewable energy use, particularly by some of America’s largest companies. A quick scroll through the weekly headlines reminds us that the demand for investing in renewables today is strong – and getting stronger. Google, Walmart, GM, Lockheed Martin, Amazon and Apple all have recently shifted millions in private funding into the clean energy sector. These moves are motivated by increased revenue… [more]

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California’s Solar Subsidies Have Little Impact On Adoption Trends

Author(s): Yevgeniy Vorobeychik
Assistant Professor
Vanderbilt University
Date: November 12, 2014 at 9:46 AM

The rooftop solar market in the US, and especially in California, has experienced explosive growth in the last decade. At least in part this growth can be attributed to the government incentive programs, which effectively reduce the system costs. One of the most aggressive incentive programs is the California Solar Initiative (CSI), a rooftop solar subsidy program initiated in 2007 with the goal of creating 1,940 megawatts of solar capacity by 2016. The CSI program has been touted as a great success, and it certainly seems so: over 2,000 megawatts have been installed to date. But how much of this… [more]

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Discussion

Is this the end of the line for wind and solar energy tax credits? Should it be?

Author(s): Ben Finzel
President
RENEWPR
Date: November 7, 2014 at 10:07 AM

The American wind energy industry has grown in spite of the “boom and bust” cycle of wind energy development fostered by the renewal-expiration-renewal cycle of the wind production tax credit (PTC). The PTC is one of the primary tools used to spur wind energy development and expired at the end of 2013. The result was a 92% drop in 2013 installations, compared to 2012. Extension of the PTC will likely be the subject of debate about so-called tax extenders during the upcoming “lame duck” session of Congress as the wind industry seeks an extension of the PTC through 2015. The… [more]

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Discussion

Tariffs Threaten the U.S. Solar Industry

Author(s): Jigar Shah
President
Jigar Shah Consulting
Date: May 1, 2014 at 7:30 AM

SolarWorld, a German-based manufacturer, has introduced a petition with the International Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Commerce seeking to impose additional antidumping (AD) and countervailing (CVD) duties on imports of solar products from China and Taiwan. Interestingly, the petition aims to relieve U.S. solar panel manufacturing companies from imports that are sold in the U.S. at less than fair value (“dumped”) or allegedly benefit from subsidies in China or Taiwan. However, the petition could increase material costs and have significant impacts on the broader U.S. solar industry. The U.S. solar industry grew ten times faster than national job… [more]

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Discussion

What Is The Future of Solar Energy?

Author(s): Daniel Kammen
Distinguished Professor of Energy
University of California, Berkeley
Date: February 27, 2014 at 11:04 AM

This is the second in a series of discussions led by invited speakers at the upcoming Physics of Sustainable Energy conference to be held March 8-9, 2014 at the University of California, Berkeley. Find more details below. The new Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System located in California’s Mojave Desert is the world’s largest concentrated solar thermal power station. The first of it’s kind at this scale, Ivanpah’s 392 megawatts of capacity (enough to power 140,000 homes) is generated by 360,000 garage-door-sized mirrors concentrating sunlight onto a 40-story boiler tower. The heat from the sunlight boils water in the tower and… [more]

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Discussion

Metrics for Comparing Alternative Liquid Fuels

Author(s): Dr. Bruce Dale
University Distinguished Professor
Michigan State University, Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Date: February 20, 2014 at 7:04 AM

It is clear that the Age of Oil is winding down. Worldwide, the rate of discovery of new oil reserves peaked in the 1960s and in the US our peak rate of oil discovery occurred in the early 1930s. In recent years the world has used about three barrels of oil for every barrel of new oil reserves discovered. Thus we are living largely on past oil discoveries. There is still a lot of oil in the world, and we will still be using a lot of oil decades from now. But it will be increasingly expensive both economically and… [more]

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Discussion

Simplifying the Energy Tax Code

Author(s): Ryan Abraham
Senior Tax Counsel
United States Senate Committee on Finance
Date: February 3, 2014 at 8:19 AM

As part of his efforts to comprehensively reform the tax code, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-MT) released a staff discussion draft on December 18, 2013 that proposed a dramatically simpler set of energy tax incentives that are technology-neutral, more predictable, and promote cleaner energy that is made in the United States. Policymakers have included tax breaks for energy in the tax code for nearly one hundred years. These incentives were created with good intentions to create jobs, promote energy security, and help reduce air pollution and environmental damage. But over the years, the number of provisions has ballooned… [more]

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