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Could New Gas-Fired Power Plant Technology Revolutionize The Energy Mix?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 1, 2012 at 7:16 AM

GE recently announced a line of new natural gas turbine models that offer both increased efficiency and flexibility. Traditionally, “Conventional natural-gas power plants are generally either flexible or efficient. That is, some can quickly increase and decrease power output to meet spikes or lulls in electricity demand, while others are able to hum along steadily without using much natural gas but take hours to bring up to speed,” wrote Kevin Bullis of MIT’s Technology Review. Power plants need to become more nimble as demand increases, fossil fuel prices continue to fluctuate, and more renewable energy sources are added to the… [more]

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Global Oil Crisis Simulation at the Herzliya Conference

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: September 27, 2012 at 8:00 AM

With oil playing such an important role in transportation, energy, and manufacturing worldwide, supply disruptions pose a serious threat to the global economy and political stability. Earlier this year, the Herzliya Conference convened a group of experts and practitioners from a range of specialties around the world to participate in a war-game that examined a possible oil-shortage scenario:  a global oil crisis initiated by a terrorist attack on the Saudi Arabian Abqaiq oil facility. Under the conditions of the simulation six million barrels of oil per day were removed from global markets, resulting in a shortage of millions of barrels… [more]

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The Promise of Networked Energy

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: September 24, 2012 at 9:50 AM

The last few years have seen advancements in energy technology improvements – particularly in the realm of efficiency, distributed generation, and the smart grid. However, many feel that the deployment of new technologies has been slowed by the political and regulatory challenges surrounding energy policy, along with the large number of stakeholders involved. A new report from the Center for American Progress, “The Networked Energy Web,” aims to reorient the energy policy discourse, away from a partisan federal policy battle, and towards pursuing a bipartisan solution for the “massive technology-deployment challenge for the economy writ large.” The authors describe the… [more]

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The Goals of Energy Policy: a Report from Sandia & OurEnergyPolicy.org

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: September 12, 2012 at 7:59 AM

According to a national survey of energy professionals jointly prepared by Sandia National Laboratories and OurEnergyPolicy.org, U.S. energy policy should simultaneously pursue energy supply security, economic outcomes, and minimized environmental impacts. Contemporary political discourse often poses energy policymaking as a binary decision—the economy versus the environment, for example. Public opinion polls frequently support this conception, posing energy policymaking options as a zero-sum game between two opposed goals. However, does this tension in the discourse accurately reflect how policy is made? Do energy professionals — people working on energy issues daily — view U.S. energy policy in this way? How might professional insights… [more]

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Your Plan to Drive Energy Innovation

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: September 10, 2012 at 3:54 PM

Energy innovation and American technological leadership has been a big point of focus in energy policy circles over the past decade. There exists a variety of strategies and plans to drive and support energy innovation, each informed by a combination of history, political and economic ideology, and circumstance, but none of them seem to have taken hold yet. Many advocate government investments in R&D, often differing on which technologies or research areas deserve funding, while others promote a more hands-off role that would see government lift the regulations that many believe stifle private sector investment and innovation. Some advocate pricing… [more]

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How do the GOP and Democratic Energy Platforms Stack Up?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: September 6, 2012 at 7:00 AM

Both the Democratic and Republican parties have released their platforms, each offering a vision of the American energy landscape in the coming years. Both parties promote distinct visions of an “all-of-the-above” approach to energy. The end goal for both parties is U.S. energy independence, with the GOP’s vision seeming to rely primarily on the development of America’s fossil fuel resources and a business-friendly regulatory regime, while the Democrats’ platform promotes a “move towards a sustainable energy-independent future” that would allocate resources between fossil fuel and renewables development, alongside to a variety of “green” initiatives. GOP Democrats Fossil Fuels Supports “new, state-of-the-art coal-fired… [more]

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Administration Releases New Fuel Economy Rules

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: September 3, 2012 at 8:49 AM

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Highway Transport Safety Administration (NHTSA) have released new rules for a corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standard that will increase fuel economy to the equivalent of 54.5 miles per gallon and reduce vehicle greenhouse gas emissions to 163 grams of carbon dioxide per mile by 2025. The EPA is establishing national GHG emissions standards under the Clean Air Act, and the NHTSA is establishing Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. Both programs will give flexibility to manufacturers to achieve compliance, including the use of a credit… [more]

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Hurricane Isaac & the SPR

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: August 30, 2012 at 10:00 AM

Over the past month, as oil prices have climbed, rumors  of a release from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) have circulated. This week, the G7 released a statement indicating the group’s readiness “to call upon the International Energy Agency to take appropriate action to ensure that the market is fully and timely supplied.” Hurricane Isaac makes a release seem more likely, as it has suspended operations of Gulf refineries with a combined refining capacity of 1 million barrels of oil per day, according to the St. Louis Post. Dan Kish of the Institute for Energy Research said on Fox Business… [more]

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Romney Camp Unveils Energy Plan

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: August 28, 2012 at 7:48 AM

Last week, GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney announced his energy platform, which emphasizes the goal of U.S. energy independence through increased offshore drilling, particularly in the mid-Atlantic, an “energy partnership” with Mexico and Canada, and through greater control over energy production on federal lands for states. “States are far better able to develop, adopt and enforce regulations based on their unique resources, geology and local concerns,” said Romney. Enacting these policies would lead to over $1 trillion in revenue for federal, state, and local governments, more than 3 million new jobs, and a resurgence in U.S. manufacturing, according to the… [more]

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Water-Energy Nexus Debate Heats Up

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: August 20, 2012 at 10:44 AM

As drought continues to affect much of the U.S., many observers are thinking critically about the water-energy nexus. A New York Times article points out the myriad ways in which water shortages can threaten energy, from low river levels reducing hydropower output, to cities banning the use of municipal water for hydraulic fracturing. Although we have yet to see water access limit our ability to produce energy, it could lead to higher energy prices, particularly for natural gas, which will increasingly require water recycling and freshwater transport from non-local sources. Biofuels will also increase in price, if crops fail and… [more]

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