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NYCEEC

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 20, 2016 at 10:27 AM

NYCEEC is a non‐profit financial services firm dedicated to financing energy efficiency and clean energy projects in buildings that save energy and reduce greenhouse gases. NYCEEC’s single-focus and deep expertise allow us to provide fast, flexible and streamlined financing to meet the full range of a project’s needs. NYCEEC has provided leadership in the multifamily and commercial market, working closely with incentive providers and utilities on some of the deepest and highest-return retrofits. Visit www.nyceec.com.

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Why You Should Care about Low Carbon Fuels and Vehicle Initiatives

Author(s): Tammy Klein
Consultant
Future Fuel Strategies
Date: December 19, 2016 at 11:30 AM

Citizens and policymakers in many countries have never been more committed to combating climate change across all sectors. One high-emitting sector that is often overlooked, when compared to industry and manufacturing, is transportation. Transport currently contributes 23% of energy-related greenhouse gas emissions and 20% of energy use. Globally, the sector is expected to double by 2030, according to IEA. Decarbonizing transport is a major challenge with some strong and powerful advocates calling for a single one-shot solution (electrification). However, achieving decarbonization in the transport sector will require multiple strategies that understand fossil fuel demand will remain in place for some… [more]

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How Demand-Side Management Can Reshape Our Energy Use

Author(s): Brent Nelson
Senior Energy Consultant
Ascend Analytics
Date: December 5, 2016 at 12:00 PM

Historically, the US power grid has primarily treated electricity demand as a (mostly) unalterable requirement that must be met by ramping dispatchable generation up or down to adjust the electricity supply. This system creates several drawbacks, including i) challenges associated with integrating intermittent renewable energy sources (such as solar and wind) that cannot be dispatched; and ii) inefficient use of resources, since the transmission, distribution, and generation systems must be built to meet the peak demand even though the peak occurs only a few hours during each year. Demand-side management (DSM) approaches can alter the net electricity required from the… [more]

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The Magical Powers of the Social Cost of Carbon

Author(s): Dr. Benjamin Zycher
Visiting Scholar
American Enterprise Institute
Date: November 21, 2016 at 10:30 AM

When last we joined hands around the ourenergypolicy.org campfire, roasting s’mores and singing songs of camaraderie, we told tales of one particular monster of the dark, to wit, the Obama administration analysis of the social cost of carbon, perhaps the most dishonest exercise in political arithmetic ever produced by the federal bureaucracy. But this is the Beltway: No perfidy goes unrewarded. And so it is with the SCC, now tailor-made for the justification of rules utterly preposterous. Consider for example the Environmental Protection Agency efficiency rule for medium- and heavy trucks, part of the administration’s climate action plan; EPA has… [more]

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What Will Energy Policy Look Like Under President Trump?

Author(s): Daniel Cohan
Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering
Rice University
Date: November 15, 2016 at 10:30 AM

President-elect Donald Trump has only vaguely defined his plans for energy policy, via his website and campaign statements and tweets. As a result, one can only speculate what changes to expect from Trump energy policies. Nevertheless, a recent report by S&P Global Platts aimed to predict how electricity will be generated under Trump energy policies. The analysis assumed Trump would allow subsidies for renewable energy to continue their scheduled scale down through 2020, and enact no new policies to support wind or solar. This is consistent with recent reporting indicating that Trump does not plan to act against renewable energy… [more]

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The Next President and Energy Policy

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 8, 2016 at 9:00 AM

With the race for President ending this week, one concern expressed by some has been the lack of any substantive discussion about US energy policy. While Mr. Trump has often mentioned reviving the coal industry as part of a larger emphasis on policies that leverage the country’s domestic energy resources, Secretary Clinton’s campaign has said her policies will look to grow clean energy resources like wind and solar energy. But after three debates, many believe the country needs more information on this topic from both candidates for President. A recent debate (video here) however between campaign advisors for Mr. Trump… [more]

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Ohio Regulators’ Controversial $600 Million for FirstEnergy

Author(s): Dick Munson
Director, Midwest Clean Energy
Environmental Defense Fund
Date: October 31, 2016 at 12:00 PM

In a long-awaited decision, Ohio regulators with the Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) approved a $600 million electricity rate plan for Ohio utilities provider, FirstEnergy. FirstEnergy has been struggling financially since a 2011 merger with Allegheny Energy. The utility paid a premium to acquire Allegheny’s coal dependency just as the cost of natural gas began its rapid decline. The PUCO decision was in response to FirstEnergy’s $4 billion bailout plan, which the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) rejected after determining the bailout equated to an illegal subsidy that distorted competitive electricity markets. In order to avoid FERC jurisdiction, FirstEnergy revised its… [more]

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Is Utility Solar Better Than Residential Solar To Meet Renewable Goals?

Author(s): Herschel Specter
President
Micro-Utilities, Inc.
Date: October 24, 2016 at 11:30 AM

Twenty-nine states have renewable energy mandates. California’s mandate calls for 33% renewable energy by 2020 while New York State mandates 50% of its electricity be renewable by 2030. It is one thing to set energy or electricity mandates and quite another to achieve them. New York is quite fortunate; today 26% of its electricity comes from renewable electricity sources. However, large hydroelectric facilities today provide 80% of NY’s renewable electricity and, unless more hydropower is imported from Canada, an expanded contribution from large hydropower seems unlikely. So to meet this 50% mandate, solar and wind which today produce 5.2% of… [more]

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U.S. Signs on to Global Agreement Capping Aviation Emissions

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 17, 2016 at 10:00 AM

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) finalized an agreement to cap the aviation industry’s CO2 emissions at 2020 levels. Due to the cross-border nature of aviation, this sector, which is responsible for 2 percent of all GHG emissions globally, was excluded from the Paris Agreement in 2015. Although the agreement’s mandatory phase begins in 2027, more than 60 countries will voluntarily participate in the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) beginning in 2021. CORSIA is a market-based measure capping emissions at 2020 levels. Airlines that exceed the emissions cap can offset their excess CO2 in two ways.… [more]

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Arguments of the Clean Power Plan

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: October 3, 2016 at 11:00 AM

Last week, the latest chapter in the Clean Power Plan saga unfolded before an en banc hearing at the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Petitioners argued the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) overstepped its congressional authority under the Clean Air Act. A central issue before the court was whether the agency exceeded its authority under Section 111(d) by designing a scheme that regulates “beyond the existing source’s fence line” – outside the four walls of the utility. Section 111(d) requires EPA to establish emission guidelines that reflect the best system of emission reductions (BSER) that have been adequately demonstrated. Petitioners, led by… [more]

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