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Maryland Resiliency Through Microgrids Task Force Report

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: January 7, 2016 at 11:42 AM

Full Title: Maryland Resiliency Through Microgrids Task Force Report Author(s): Maryland Energy Administration Publisher(s): Maryland Energy Administration Publication Date: 2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Recognizing the value that microgrids can offer to energy surety and resiliency, on February 25, 2014, Governor Martin O’Malley directed his Energy Advisor to lead a Resiliency Through Microgrids Task Force (“Task Force”) to study the statutory, regulatory, financial, and technical barriers to the deployment of microgrids in Maryland. The Governor’s charge required the Task Force to develop a “roadmap for action” to pave the way for private sector deployment of microgrids across the State. As… [more]

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Could Hydropower Flood America With New Power?

Author(s): James Conca
Senior Scientist
UFA Ventures, Inc.
Date: January 4, 2016 at 12:00 PM

After the events of COP21, the National Hydropower Association’s (NHA) goal to expand hydropower in America over the next few decades seems especially important. The existing hydro fleet was constructed over the course of an entire century and constitutes the longest-lived energy facilities in the world. NHA’s goal is to double hydropower by adding 60 GW of capacity by 2030 which will produce an additional 300 billion kWhs of electricity each year, without building a single new dam. Energy Secretary, Ernest Moniz agrees, stating, “Hydropower can double its contributions by the year 2030. We have to pick up the covers… [more]

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U.S. – China Energy Cooperation: Risks, Opportunities and Solutions

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 14, 2015 at 12:00 PM

At a recent event hosted by the Hudson Institute, energy professionals gathered to discuss energy issues affecting both the United States and China, with significant discussion centering on how low oil prices generally correlate with economic prosperity and stability – and vice versa. It is projected that China’s oil import dependence will rise from 60% in 2013 to 75% in 2035 and that, in the next 15 years, China will overtake the U.S. as the world’s largest oil consumer. Like the U.S., China’s sustained economic growth is directly influenced by the price of oil. Although crude oil price spikes are… [more]

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Should We Use the Strategic Petroleum Reserve as a Revenue Stream?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 3, 2015 at 12:00 PM

The U.S. currently maintains one of the world’s largest stockpiles of government owned oil, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). In response to the 1970s oil embargo and supply shocks, the U.S. created the SPR to ensure access to oil in the event of a severe energy supply interruption. The current SPR consists of four storage sites, housing 694 million barrels of oil that is equivalent to at least 90 days of net oil imports. The SPR has only been tapped three times, but the recent budget deal provides that the government sell 58 million barrels of oil to fund a… [more]

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Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 23, 2015 at 4:31 PM

Full Title: Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants Author(s): U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Publisher(s): U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Publication Date: 2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): When a power company decides to close a nuclear power plant permanently, the facility must be decommissioned by safely removing it from service and reducing residual radioactivity to a level that permits release of the property and termination of the operating license. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has strict rules governing nuclear power plant decommissioning, involving cleanup of radioactively contaminated plant systems and structures, and removal of the radioactive fuel. These requirements protect workers and… [more]

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Coordinating State and Federal Energy Policy in Support of Nuclear

Author(s): Dr. Andrew C. Kadak
President
Kadak Associates, Inc.
Date: November 16, 2015 at 12:00 PM

There is an inconvenient and uncomfortable truth that nuclear energy is a significant non-CO2 source of electrical power in the U.S. Despite the dramatic expansion of solar and wind, these alternative forms of energy only provide 15% of non-CO2 emitting power nationwide. Nuclear energy on the other hand, provides 63% of all CO2-free sources. Often when a utility decides to shut down a nuclear plant it is replaced by natural gas. But replacing nuclear with “clean” natural gas only adds to the global CO2 load. In fact, each 1,000 megawatts of nuclear power replaced by natural gas adds 3.6 million… [more]

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Renewable Energy in the 50 States: Western Region

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 13, 2015 at 11:58 AM

Full Title: Renewable Energy in the 50 States: Western Region Author(s): Nancy Saracino, Jack Stoddard, and Cameron Prell, Crowell & Moring LLP Publisher(s): American Council on Renewable Energy Publication Date: 11/2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Dynamic changes in markets and policy continue to create opportunities and present challenges for renewable generation in the western United States. Renewable supply in western states has continued to increase rapidly as a result of state and federal policy initiatives. In order to integrate further increases in renewable capacity, regulators are looking to increase energy storage and flexible demand response capacity, which can… [more]

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Fueling Marine Shipping: The Potential of LNG?

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 9, 2015 at 12:00 PM

There are over 90,000 cargo ships powered by oil-based fuels that, according to one study, account for 3-4% of worldwide emissions (including SOx, NOx, PM and CO2). In 2012, the International Maritime Organization sparked a series of regulations aimed at reducing sulfur emissions and in January, 2015, a new U.S. rule went into effect that requires ships operating in coastal waters to make further reductions. With an abundance of U.S. natural gas, one potentially cost-effective compliance option is to transition and build new LNG-fueled ships; however, challenges remain. Supporters of LNG as a fuel source say it will reduce air… [more]

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Tracking Clean Energy Progress 2015

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 3, 2015 at 4:04 PM

Full Title: Tracking Clean Energy Progress 2015 Author(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Published annually, the Tracking Clean Energy Progress (TCEP) report highlights how the overall development and deployment of clean energy technologies evolve, year on year. Each technology and sector is tracked against the interim 2025 2°C Scenario (2DS) targets of the IEA Energy Technology Perspectives 2015 (ETP 2015), which lays out pathways towards a sustainable energy system in 2050. This comprehensive overview examines the latest developments in key clean energy technologies: Recent trends with reference to… [more]

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Medium-Term Gas Market Report 2015: Market Analysis and Forecasts to 2020

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: at 3:47 PM

Full Title: Medium-Term Gas Market Report 2015: Market Analysis and Forecasts to 2020 Author(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publisher(s): International Energy Agency (IEA) Publication Date: 2015 Full Text: ->DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT<- Description (excerpt): Global natural gas demand remained weak in 2014, falling well below its ten-year average. High prices for gas in the past two years undermined its competitiveness, bringing to light a harsh reality: in a world of cheap coal and falling costs for renewables, gas has laboured to compete. Although Asia has been regarded as an engine of future gas demand growth, the fuel has struggled to expand its share… [more]

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