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January 14, 2019 at 10:40 AM

Our Urgent Need for Energy Infrastructure

by: James Conca
Senior Scientist
UFA Ventures, Inc.
Comments
8

In the United States, public debates surrounding energy policy focus on generation, carbon emissions, and cost. But all is for naught if the infrastructure that carries power isn’t appropriate for the changing energy mix or can’t keep up because it’s crumbling. With new technologies rising faster than sea level on a hot planet, the United States is in the midst of the biggest energy boom in 60 years. We have more natural gas, coal, and uranium than we need for several hundred years; new and better solar cells; new biofuel technologies to replace ethanol; and even more oil than we

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December 31, 2018 at 10:29 AM

Looking Back and Pushing Ahead: Energy Policy in the New Year

by: OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Comments
4

From attempts to bail out coal and nuclear to a Green New Deal, 2018 was an interesting year for energy policy. With a newly divided Congress taking office in January, it seems likely that disagreements regarding the future of the energy industry will continue in 2019, though there may be areas with potential for bipartisanship. Outside of the federal government, it can be expected that 2019 will continue the trend of many state and local governments, as well as private organizations, being active in shaping the direction of our energy sector.

A major trend of 2018, which will continue

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December 18, 2018 at 10:28 AM

Xcel Commits to Carbon-Free 2050

by: Greg Gershuny
Interim Director, Energy and Environment Program
The Aspen Institute
Comments
6

Minneapolis-based public utility Xcel Energy announced that it will be completely carbon-free by 2050. California’s SB100, which passed earlier this year, sets a similar goal for the state by 2045, but Xcel is the first utility in the nation to set a goal this bold. Xcel has already taken steps to become more sustainable. In 2017, 40% of Xcel’s electricity generation was carbon-free, with much of that coming from wind and nuclear power. According to its website, Xcel intends to double the wind power it generates by 2022 and plans to retire 40% of its coal capacity by

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December 3, 2018 at 11:37 AM

The Problem with Renewable Energy Subsidies

by: Cutter González
Energy Project Campaign Manager, Policy Analyst
Texas Public Policy Foundation
Comments
7

The Production Tax Credit (PTC), a federal subsidy for renewable energy, is a $24-per-megawatt-hour credit based on energy production rather than demand. That means those who produce renewable energy can receive the credit regardless of whether or not that electricity is actually needed. The incentive is so immense that at peak hours of output wind producers can actually pay retail electric providers, the companies that deliver the energy to homes and businesses, to take their product.

This “negative pricing” scheme caused by the PTC and other subsidies is having serious consequences.The instability it causes can push out the energy

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November 26, 2018 at 10:04 AM

After Two Defeats in Washington State, Where Next For A Carbon Tax?

by: Ed Dolan
Senior Fellow
Niskanen Center
Comments
33

Conservative and progressive policy wonks agree: a carbon tax is the most promising of all tools to fight climate change. Such a tax would spur investments in green energy and encourage motorists to buy more electric cars. It would minimize the role of regulatory bureaucrats and maximize that of markets. What is not to love about a carbon tax?

The sticking point is what to do with the billions of dollars of revenues such a tax would generate. Conservatives favor using the money for a revenue-neutral tax swap. Lower taxes on capital would encourage investment, lower payroll taxes would encourage

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All statements and/or propositions in discussion prompts are meant exclusively to stimulate discussion and do not represent the views of OurEnergyPolicy.org, its Partners, Topic Directors or Experts, nor of any individual or organization. Comments by and opinions of Expert participants are their own.

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