Search Results for carbon-emissions
28 item(s) were returned.
Discussion

The Keystone Pipeline Controversy: What’s Really At Stake?

Author(s): David J. Manning
Director, Stakeholder Relations/External Affairs
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Date: September 5, 2013 at 7:05 AM

Keystone XL has been called the world’s best known pipeline that has not been built. Controversy over the pipeline itself has largely subsided but this project linking the oil sands of Northern Alberta to the large refineries of the Gulf Coast has become a rallying point for an “off oil” campaign. A presidential permit for import facilities is the sole remaining requirement before construction can begin. KXL would be the 82nd major pipeline in the US, and is the safest and most technologically advanced. It would provide diluted bitumen from Alberta’s oil sands and Bakken crude from Montana and North Dakota to… [more]

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Are Microgrids the Answer to the Increasing Complexity of Electricity Markets?

Author(s): J. David Erickson
Public Utilities Regulatory Analyst
California Public Utilities Commission
Date: August 23, 2013 at 9:48 AM

The state of California is faced with the challenge of reaching its carbon emissions reduction and renewable portfolio standard goals while maintaining the safety and reliability of the electric supply and protecting the economic interests of the ratepayers. In addition to AB 32, which calls for reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, the state also has a Renewable Portfolio Standard goal of 33% renewables by 2020. The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) and many stakeholders have been working on policies, technologies and market mechanisms to reach these goals. Managing the effect… [more]

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The European Union’s Emissions Trading System: Climate Model, Now Climate Muddle?

Author(s): Wil Burns
Co-Executive Director
The Institute for Carbon Removal Law and Policy, American University
Date: July 15, 2013 at 10:26 AM

The European Union’s Emissions Trading System (EU-ETS) is an extremely important component of global climate policymaking. It represents more than 80% of the global market value of emissions trading permits and serves as the cornerstone of the EU’s response to climate change. Moreover, a number of other States and sub-national actors, such as California – which has the second largest carbon trading program in the world – have either linked their emissions trading systems to the EU-ETS, or contemplate doing so in the future. However, with the price of allowances plummeting a startling 83% from 2008-2013 the EU-ETS is abjectly… [more]

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Looking Beyond the President’s Climate Speech

Author(s): Herschel Specter
President
Micro-Utilities, Inc.
Date: June 27, 2013 at 4:14 PM

The President was on target during his speech on climate change at Georgetown University when he announced new initiatives to curb the release of greenhouse gases and thereby slow down the effects of climate change. However, a key aspect to meeting this huge challenge is to set national goals based on specific timetables. Without President Kennedy setting a goal to land an American on the moon by a specific date, it is doubtful that we would have ever achieved this. President Obama’s goal-setting in his recent speech was incomplete and rather imbalanced. There was a goal to double renewable energy… [more]

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Can You Be An Environmentalist and Pro-Nuclear?

Author(s): David Hammer
J.C. Ward Jr. Professor of Nuclear Energy Engineering
Cornell University
Date: June 20, 2013 at 7:03 AM

The premise of Robert Stone’s newly released documentary, Pandora’s Promise, is that despite the scary features of nuclear radiation, nuclear power is the best chance we have to avoid the catastrophe projected from burning fossil fuels to power the growing world economy. The documentary’s approach is rather unique – former anti-nuclear environmentalists describe how and why they became pro-nuclear, in spite of even the recent major Fukushima Daiichi reactor disaster. It is important to add that Director Robert Stone is not arguing that standard “light water reactors” (LWRs) should be pursued, but rather newer designs, such as inherently safe breeder… [more]

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Transcript – Our National Energy Policy: Post-Election Prospects and Challenges

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: December 21, 2012 at 2:49 PM

“Our National Energy Policy: Post-Election Prospects and Challenges” December 14th, 2012 National Press Club, Washington, DC See below for an abridged version of the transcript and a full video recording of the event. You can view or download the full transcript here. Opening Remarks: WILLIAM SQUADRON, President, OurEnergyPolicy.org Speakers: JAMES CONNAUGHTON, Executive Vice President and Senior Policy Advisor with Exelon Corporation and Former Chairman of the White House Council on Environmental Quality GENERAL JAMES L. JONES, USMC (retired), Senior Fellow at the Bipartisan Policy Center, Senior Advisor to the American Energy Innovation Council with the Bipartisan Policy Center, and Former… [more]

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Carbon Tax on the Table

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: November 15, 2012 at 7:10 AM

As the US nears the “fiscal cliff,” the idea of a revenue-neutral carbon “tax swap,” which would see revenue from a carbon tax used to reduce other taxes, while driving innovation in energy efficiency and alternative energy, has been proposed by a number of policymakers and academics. A new report from the Institute for Energy Research argues against the carbon “tax swap,” pointing to technical and pragmatic flaws, such as the probability of emissions “leaking” to other, less regulated regions, like China. A report from MIT, however, found that a carbon tax would have multiple benefits, such as reducing emissions,… [more]

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High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon future

Author(s): OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
Date: March 28, 2012 at 2:51 PM

Full Title:  High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-cost and low-carbon future Author(s): Nelson J, Johnston J, Mileva A, Fripp M, Hoffman I, Petros-Good A, Blanco C, Kammen DM Publisher(s): Energy Policy Publication Date: 1/2012 Language: English Length: 14 pages, PDF Full Text: –>DOWNLOAD FILE<– Description (excerpt): Decarbonizing electricity production is central to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Exploiting intermittent renewable energy resources demands power system planning models with high temporal and spatial resolution. We use a mixed-integer linear programming model – SWITCH – to analyze least- cost generation, storage, and transmission capacity expansion for western North… [more]

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