The Water-Energy Nexus: How Can Collaboration Lead to Greater Impact?

Posted by Diana Bauer
Director of Energy Systems Analysis and Integration
Department of Energy
December 17, 2014 at 1:54 PM Filed Under: Critical Policy Issues, Discussions, Studies and Papers

This prompt is the second in a series of discussions led by invited speakers at the upcoming 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change to be held January 27-29, 2015 in Washington, DC.

Energy and water systems have historically been designed and managed independently.  However, the systems are, in fact, interdependent.  In its simplest form, the energy-water nexus can be broken into two parts: “energy for water” —the energy required to treat, transport, or heat water—and “water for energy” —the water required for cooling thermoelectric power plants, oil and gas production, … [read more]

Abundance or Scarcity? Re-examining U.S. Oil and Gas Policy

Posted by OurEnergyPolicy.org
Administrator
OurEnergyPolicy.org
December 8, 2014 at 12:37 PM Filed Under: Critical Policy Issues, Discussions

On December 3rd, 2014, OurEnergyPolicy.org hosted “Abundance or Scarcity? Re-examining U.S. Oil & Gas Policy,” a panel event at the Capitol Visitor Center in Washington, DC. The panel discussed how recent growth in domestic oil and gas production is transforming the U.S. energy sector and challenging the paradigm of energy scarcity that has underpinned federal policy for the last 40 years. Topics covered include policy issues related to exports, finance, climate change, infrastructure, natural gas as a transportation fuel and politically viable energy legislation. Find the full video below and the transcript here.

Introduction: Bill Squadron[read more]

Bipartisan Energy Policy: The Solution or the Problem?

Posted by Peter Grossman
Clarence Efroymson Professor of Economics
Butler University
December 3, 2014 at 7:22 AM Filed Under: Critical Policy Issues, Discussions

US_Capitol_SouthAs I explain in U.S. Energy Policy and the Pursuit of Failure, bipartisan compromise is possible and has led to policy change in the past. However, that change has almost always been bad for the country. Bipartisanship has given us ill-conceived and wasteful programs for synthetic fuels, breeder reactors, “super cars,” windmills, and ethanol. The problem runs much deeper than the current President or the balance of parties in Congress. For the past forty years, U.S. energy policy has been premised on false concepts of markets, government, technology, and history.

The basis for this policy paradigm goes something like … [read more]

How Can We Enhance The Efficiency Of The Existing Coal Power Plant Fleet?

Posted by Janet Gellici
Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer
National Coal Council
November 24, 2014 at 10:14 AM Filed Under: Discussions, Studies and Papers

UntitledThe existing fleet of coal-fired power plants is critical to the economic prosperity of the U.S. As the leading provider of U.S. electricity generation (at 39%), low cost coal keeps electricity prices below those of other free market nations and provides a competitive edge for U.S industry. In addition, the “Polar Vortex” weather events of January and February 2014 demonstrated the contribution of the existing coal fleet to the reliability of the U.S. electricity grid. After limited natural gas resources were diverted from electricity production to residential heating needs, coal-fired power plants made up the difference. Nationwide, over 90% of … [read more]

Dynamic Distribution System: Transforming the Grid from the Distribution System Out

Posted by Gary Radloff
Director of Midwest Energy Policy Analysis
Wisconsin Energy Institute
November 19, 2014 at 7:12 AM Filed Under: Critical Policy Issues, Discussions

This prompt is the first in a series of discussions led by invited speakers at the upcoming 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change to be held January 27-29, 2015 in Washington, DC.

electric-poles-384623_640The environmental benefits and declining price of solar, wind, storage and other distributed energy resources are driving their increased use in the electrical utility system. As a result, more power is being generated at homes, businesses, and commercial buildings and used locally. This jump in power production at the distribution level presents a challenge to the traditional electrical … [read more]

All statements and/or propositions in discussion prompts are meant exclusively to stimulate discussion and do not represent the views of OurEnergyPolicy.org, its Partners, Topic Directors or Experts, nor of any individual or organization. Comments by and opinions of Expert participants are their own.